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Du Pont III DD- 941 - History

Du Pont III DD- 941 - History

Du Pont III

(DD-941: dp. 3,807 (f.); 1. 418'5"; b. 45'1"; dr. 14'2n;
s. 30 k.; cpl. 311; a 3 5", 4 3", 4 21" tt., 1 det.; cl.
Forrest Sherman)

The third Du Pont (DD-941) was launched 8 September 1956 by Bath Iron Works Corp., Bath, Maine; sponsored by Mrs. H. B. Du Pont, great-great-grandniece of Rear Admiral Du Pont; and commissioned 1 July 1957, Commander W. J. Maddocks in command.

From 6 to 31 July 1958 Du Pont served on a midshipman cruise and antisubmarine exercises in the Atlantic, duty broken by a visit to New York. Du Pont sailed 2 September for a tour of duty with the 6th Fleet in the Mediterranean, during which she participated in highly realistic air defense and antisubmarine warfare problems. She returned to Norfolk 12 March 1959, to prepare for Operation "Inland Sea," the historic first passage of a naval task force into the Great Lakes through the Saint Lawrence Seaway. She escorted HMS Brittania with Queen Elizabeth II of England embarked during the dedicatory ceremonies of 26 June.

Du Pont crossed the Atlantic in August and September 1959, visiting Southhampton, England, after serving as plane guard for the transatlantic flight of President D. D. Eisenhower. On 28 January 1960 Du Pont sailed from Norfolk for a second tour of duty with the 6th Fleet in the Mediterranean, returning to Norfolk on 31 August for an overhaul in the Naval Shipyard where she remained through the end of 1960.


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Better Living was a Du Pont employee magazine created and published by the company's public relations department. The magazine, which began publication in 1946, featured the company's popular advertising slogan "Better Things for Better Living. Through Chemistry." In keeping with this branding, its issues featured photojournalistic essays celebrating Du Pont products' contribution to improving American standards of living, features depicting Du Pont employees at work and at leisure, updates on Du Pont activities at home and abroad, and articles extolling free market values and the role of citizen consumers in postwar America.


Interests

Du Pont began exploring his wide array of interests in the following years, embarking on nature expeditions to the Philippines, Samoa, the Fiji Islands and other exotic locales. He also indulged his athletic desires, training with the Olympic-caliber athletes of California&aposs Santa Clara Swim Club.

After graduating from the University of Miami with a degree in marine biology in 1965, du Pont decided to try his hand at the modern pentathlon. He competed in several events with the goal of making the 1968 U.S. Olympic team, but fell short in his bid.

In 1972, du Pont founded the Delaware Museum of Natural History and installed himself as the director. He also wrote four books about birds during this time period.


Du Pont III DD- 941 - History

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Du Pont heiress pocked by scandalous headlines dies

Lisa Dean Moseley, the du Pont heiress known as much for being part of the state's premier family as she was for making headlines in questionable transactions, died last week.

Services, which have not occurred since her April 25 death, will be private.

Born in Wilmington to the late Paulina du Pont Dean and J. Simpson Dean Sr., Moseley was a founder of the Fieldstone Golf Club in Greenville and an active member of the Vicmead Hunt Club and the Garden Club of Wilmington. She also encouraged basic medical and scientific research through a charitable foundation she established a dozen years ago.

"Lisa Dean Moseley was a highly respected member among her cousins," family patriarch Irenee du Pont Jr. of Granogue said. He was a first cousin of Moseley's mother. "We are all mourning her loss."

Her death marks the dwindling of the older generation of du Pont family members.

She is among the generation of du Ponts who came of age during the golden era of the DuPont Co., which brought enormous wealth and prestige to the family. This is a time when family members still controlled the giant chemical company and the du Pont name became synonymous with the world's greatest industrialists.

As a young woman, she was considered an exotic beauty thanks to looks that were "passed down from a Lebanese great-grandmother," author Dominick Dunne wrote in the 1999 Vanity Fair article "In Cold, Blue Blood."

"Like all really stylish women, Lisa Dean found her look early and never changed it," Dunne wrote. "'Sleek' and 'glamorous' were the adjectives that applied to her. She looked rich, even before you knew she was."

Later in life, however, Moseley's name became tied with several high-profile controversies.

Her third husband, Christopher Moseley, was charged in 1998 with the contract murder of Patricia Margello – the girlfriend of his wife's son Simpson Dean MacGuigan.

Christopher Moseley was accused of hiring three people to kill Margello, 45, a former South Philadelphia prostitute, because he did not approve of her relationship with MacGuigan. He later testified in court that he and his wife blamed Margello for MacGuigan's long-running drug problems. Margello's body was found Aug. 5, 1998, stuffed inside an air-conditioning duct in a Las Vegas motel.

She had been badly beaten, strangled and put into a plastic garbage bag.

Christopher Moseley later confessed to ordering the killing and paying hit man Ricardo Murillo, ex-porn actress Diana Hironaga and Joseph Balignasa $15,000 to commit the crime. He was convicted in the murder plot and sentenced in Las Vegas in March 2000 to 16 years in federal prison and ordered to pay $100,000 in fines. He died in prison on May 25, 2004.

A day after her husband's death, the chemical fortune heiress' name surfaced in a federal corruption case indictment that said she had loaned $2.3 million to Sherry Freebery – who was top aide to New Castle County Executive Tom Gordon at the time. This was during the first two terms he held office.

According to the 47-page indictment, there was a scheme – run by Freebery – to help the developer of the Fieldstone Golf Club obtain the necessary permits for a clubhouse. Moseley, who was identified in the indictment only by her initials, had "loaned" Freebery more than $2 million between 2000 and 2001. In March 2001 she left Freebery a message stating "SOS. Please call asap - need help with Fieldstone," according to the indictment.

The written message was found in Freebery's bedroom during a 2002 search of her home, according to the indictment.

A county employee wrote on the clubhouse permit "Chief, we deliver," after Freebery made arrangements for the permit, according to the indictment. The indictment accused Gordon and Freebery of creating false documents to cover up Freebery's receipt of the $2 million and her involvement in the permit process. It also alleged they pulled related documents out of county files and spent more than $30,000 of county money hiring lawyers to threaten The News Journal in its attempts to investigate the matter.

The indictment accused the pair of spending $13,000 of taxpayer money hiring two law firms to research ways Freebery could hide the money.

It also included statements that Gordon made about the situation: "She [Freebery] shouldn't have done it," the indictment said. "It was interference, and we're all gonna end up in a [expletive] jam." The indictment did not say when or to whom the statement was made.

The case was dropped in 2007 in exchange for lesser pleas. Freebery pleaded guilty to one felony count of making a false statement to a bank for failing to include on a mortgage application that she had a $2.3 million loan from Moseley. She was sentenced to one year of probation and ordered to pay $350 in fines and court costs.

Moseley's name later surfaced, this time when her first cousin Richard S. du Pont filed for bankruptcy in April 2012. Like other Delaware residents, he sought protection from the federal court as a result of the economic slump. According to the bankruptcy petition, Moseley lent her cousin $50,000.

Later that year, her name came up again in relation to New Castle County politics. This time when Gordon selected then-Capt. Elmer Setting to be the chief of county police. Setting disclosed then that he, his wife and their three daughters had been renting their Greenville home from Moseley for the last 13 years.

He continues to live there, however, until recently the living arrangement was not included publicly in his financial interest disclosures that public officials must file with the county.

Setting's 2014 statement of financial interest was originally filed in April 2015 and amended in February to note the cash-free arrangement. In the form, Setting said he provides security and maintenance in exchange for residing on the property. Setting's 2013 filing, his only other since becoming chief, makes no mention of the arrangement. Disclosure forms for 2015 were due May 1.

Julie Sebring, an attorney for the New Castle County Ethics Commission, could not comment on what prompted Setting to file the February update more thoroughly laying out his living arrangement for citizens. She said there is no active ethics commission investigation tied to the arrangement.

Setting has not returned multiple calls on the issue and declined comment through a spokesman. Gordon's administration also declined comment on the change through a spokeswoman.


Ближайшие родственники

About Adeline, comtesse de Meulan

Adeine married Roger de Beaumont circa 1048 or earlier. Adeline of Meulan (ca. 1014-1020 - 1081), daughter of Waleran III, Count de Meulan and Oda de Conteville, and sister and heiress of a childless Count of Meulan. Meulan eventually passed to their elder son who became Count of Meulan in 1081.

Their surviving children were:

F, #3811, d. circa 8 April 1081

Children of Adeline de Meulan and Roger de Beaumont, Seigneur de Portaudemer

Henry de Newburgh, 1st Earl of Warwick+1 d. 1123

Robert de Meulan, 1st Earl of Leicester+ b. c 1046, d. 5 Jun 1118

[S22] Sir Bernard Burke, C.B. LL.D., A Genealogical History of the Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages of the British Empire, new edition (1883 reprint, Baltimore, Maryland: Genealogical Publishing Company, 1978), page 399. Hereinafter cited as Burkes Extinct Peerage.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

He married circa 1048 or earlier Adeline of Meulan (ca. 1014-1020 - 1081), daughter of Waleran III, Count de Meulan and Oda de Conteville, and sister and heiress of a childless Count of Meulan. Meulan eventually passed to their elder son who became Count of Meulan in 1081. Their surviving children were:

Robert de Beaumont, 1st Earl of Leicester, Count of Meulan (b ca 1049 - 1118) who succeeded his father in the major part of his lands, and who fought in his first battle at Hastings.

Henry de Beaumont, 1st Earl of Warwick, overshadowed by his elder brother, but who established a more enduring line of Beaumont earls at Warwick Castle.

William de Beaumont (not mentioned in most sources).

Alberee de Beaumont, Abbess of Eton.

It is known that Adeline is the daughter of the Comte Valeran (Galeran) III de Meulan and Oda de Conteville, but it is not known if she is the sister of Marie de Meulan, our family's ancestor.

According to Lazarus Long's ancestry:

Count Of Meulan Waleran DE MEULAN 7,37,45,70,102,105,115,117,262,377,378,838 was born in 990 in Mellent, Normandy, France.377,709 [NEED TO DEFINE SENTENCE: Alt. Death]262

He was also known as Beaumont. OCCU Count of Meulan .

SOUR Royalty for Commoners, Roderick W. Stuart, p. 140

SOUR Royalty for Commoners, Roderick W. Stuart, p. 140 HAWKINS.GED & gendex.com/users/daver/rigney/D0001 say 1069

www.teleport.com/ddonahue/donahue says 1069

Galeran III, of Mellant, Normandy - Royalty for Commoners, Roderick W. Stuart,

p. 140 www.teleport.com/ddonahue/donahue says parents are Robert, Count of Meulan and Alix de Vexin - NPH

Parents: Cmte Robert (Count Of Meulan) BEAUMONT and Adela DE VEXIN. Parents: Robert MEULAN and Alix De VEXIN.

Count Of Meulan Waleran DE MEULAN and Oda DE CONTEVILLE were married about 1017 in Of Ponteaudemer, Normandy, France.377

Children were: Countess Of Meulent Adeline DE MEULAN, Hugh BEAUMONT, Marie DE MEULAN.

Children were: Waleran DE MEULAN, Waleran De MEULAN, Fulk DE MEULAN, Fulk De MEULAN

According to French Wikipedia's page on Adeline's husband, Roger de Beaumont:

Il épousa, entre 1045 et 1050, Adeline de Meulan († 8 avril 1081), fille de Galéran III, comte de Meulan. Elle-même devint comtesse de Meulan lorsque son frère Hugues III entra dans les ordres à l'abbaye du Bec en 1077. Ils eurent pour enfants, entre autres :

Robert Ier de Beaumont, comte de Meulan (1081) et de Leicester (1090).

Henri de Beaumont († 1119), 1er comte de Warwick.

Alberພ (ou Aubrພ) de Beaumont, abbesse d'Eton.

Roger de Beaumont married Adeline de Meulan (d. 8 April 1081), daughter of Galeran III, Comte de Meulan, between 1045 and 1050. She became herself the Comtesse de Meulan when her brother, Hugh III, took his orders in the Abbey de Bec in 1077. The couple had four children, among others:

1. Roger I de Beaumont, Comte Meulan (1081) and Leicester (1090).

2. Hugh de Beaumont (d. 1119), first Earl of Warwick.

4. Alberee (or Aubree) de Beaumont, Abbess of Eaton. ADELINE DE MEULLANT born 1014 of Pontaudemer, Normandy, France and daughter of and eventually sole heiress of Waleran, Comte de Meullant, a great feudal nobleman of France. Adeline died in 1081.

Children: Abbot William, Abbess Albrede, Earl Robert, Earl Henry (c.1045) Adeine married Roger de Beaumont circa 1048 or earlier. Adeline of Meulan (ca. 1014-1020 - 1081), daughter of Waleran III, Count de Meulan and Oda de Conteville, and sister and heiress of a childless Count of Meulan. Meulan eventually passed to their elder son who became Count of Meulan in 1081.

Their surviving children were:

1. Robert de Beaumont, 1st Earl of Leicester, Count of Meulan (b ca 1049 - 1118) who succeeded his father in the major part of his lands, and who fought in his first battle at Hastings. 2. Henry de Beaumont, 1st Earl of Warwick, overshadowed by his elder brother, but who established a more enduring line of Beaumont earls at Warwick Castle. 3. William de Beaumont (not mentioned in most sources). 4. Alberee de Beaumont, Abbess of Eton.

F, #3811, d. circa 8 April 1081

Adeline de Meulan was the daughter of Waleran III de Meulan, Comte de Meulan. She died circa 8 April 1081. Children of Adeline de Meulan and Roger de Beaumont, Seigneur de Portaudemer

Henry de Newburgh, 1st Earl of Warwick+1 d. 1123

Robert de Meulan, 1st Earl of Leicester+ b. c 1046, d. 5 Jun 1118

[S22] Sir Bernard Burke, C.B. LL.D., A Genealogical History of the Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages of the British Empire, new edition (1883 reprint, Baltimore, Maryland: Genealogical Publishing Company, 1978), page 399. Hereinafter cited as Burkes Extinct Peerage.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

He married circa 1048 or earlier Adeline of Meulan (ca. 1014-1020 - 1081), daughter of Waleran III, Count de Meulan and Oda de Conteville, and sister and heiress of a childless Count of Meulan. Meulan eventually passed to their elder son who became Count of Meulan in 1081. Their surviving children were:

Robert de Beaumont, 1st Earl of Leicester, Count of Meulan (b ca 1049 - 1118) who succeeded his father in the major part of his lands, and who fought in his first battle at Hastings.

Henry de Beaumont, 1st Earl of Warwick, overshadowed by his elder brother, but who established a more enduring line of Beaumont earls at Warwick Castle.

William de Beaumont (not mentioned in most sources).

Alberee de Beaumont, Abbess of Eton.

It is known that Adeline is the daughter of the Comte Valeran (Galeran) III de Meulan and Oda de Conteville, but it is not known if she is the sister of Marie de Meulan, our family's ancestor.

According to Lazarus Long's ancestry:

Count Of Meulan Waleran DE MEULAN 7,37,45,70,102,105,115,117,262,377,378,838 was born in 990 in Mellent, Normandy, France.377,709 [NEED TO DEFINE SENTENCE: Alt. Death]262

He was also known as Beaumont. OCCU Count of Meulan .

SOUR Royalty for Commoners, Roderick W. Stuart, p. 140

SOUR Royalty for Commoners, Roderick W. Stuart, p. 140 HAWKINS.GED & gendex.com/users/daver/rigney/D0001 say 1069

www.teleport.com/ddonahue/donahue says 1069

Galeran III, of Mellant, Normandy - Royalty for Commoners, Roderick W. Stuart,

p. 140 www.teleport.com/ddonahue/donahue says parents are Robert, Count of Meulan and Alix de Vexin - NPH

Parents: Cmte Robert (Count Of Meulan) BEAUMONT and Adela DE VEXIN. Parents: Robert MEULAN and Alix De VEXIN.

Count Of Meulan Waleran DE MEULAN and Oda DE CONTEVILLE were married about 1017 in Of Ponteaudemer, Normandy, France.377

Children were: Countess Of Meulent Adeline DE MEULAN, Hugh BEAUMONT, Marie DE MEULAN.

Children were: Waleran DE MEULAN, Waleran De MEULAN, Fulk DE MEULAN, Fulk De MEULAN

According to French Wikipedia's page on Adeline's husband, Roger de Beaumont:

Il épousa, entre 1045 et 1050, Adeline de Meulan († 8 avril 1081), fille de Galéran III, comte de Meulan. Elle-même devint comtesse de Meulan lorsque son frère Hugues III entra dans les ordres à l'abbaye du Bec en 1077. Ils eurent pour enfants, entre autres :

Robert Ier de Beaumont, comte de Meulan (1081) et de Leicester (1090).

Henri de Beaumont († 1119), 1er comte de Warwick.

Alberພ (ou Aubrພ) de Beaumont, abbesse d'Eton.

Roger de Beaumont married Adeline de Meulan (d. 8 April 1081), daughter of Galeran III, Comte de Meulan, between 1045 and 1050. She became herself the Comtesse de Meulan when her brother, Hugh III, took his orders in the Abbey de Bec in 1077. The couple had four children, among others:

1. Roger I de Beaumont, Comte Meulan (1081) and Leicester (1090).

2. Hugh de Beaumont (d. 1119), first Earl of Warwick.

4. Alberee (or Aubree) de Beaumont, Abbess of Eaton. -------------------- ADELINE DE MEULLANT born 1014 of Pontaudemer, Normandy, France and daughter of and eventually sole heiress of Waleran, Comte de Meullant, a great feudal nobleman of France. Adeline died in 1081.

Children: Abbot William, Abbess Albrede, Earl Robert, Earl Henry (c.1045)


Dark day in Kearny history

Photos courtesy KPD
(Top) View of blast site as seen from Belgrove Drive vantage point. Large building on hill across river would in 1957 become Essex Catholic High School. (Bottom) Cranes and steam shovels begin clearing mountain of debris.

By Karen Zautyk

“At 5:50 p.m., this date, August 19 . . .” the police report reads, “a terrific explosion was heard in Kearny and about the same time an alarm of fire was sent in over Fire Box 121, located at Belgrove Dr. and Passaic Ave.”

If you didn’t hear anything on Aug. 19, don’t be concerned the sound of the “terrific explosion” echoes now only through history. The date was Aug. 19, 1943. This Monday marked the 70th anniversary of a local tragedy that claimed the lives of 13 people and injured many more.

A few older folk remember the day, some of their children recall hearing stories about it, however, most people in this town and the surrounding communities apparently have no knowledge of the event. This included your correspondent.

I was enlightened last week by Officer Tom Wilgus of the Kearny Police Department who works in the Records Bureau and who came across the 70-year-old police file on the case — which, as far as we know, could still be an open case on the federal level.

Early this year, Sgt. Pat Sweeney, who heads the bureau, was going through some other old papers in the storage room, “and I just happened to go back there,” Wilgus said. And what he noticed was one file that was unusually thick. “

It was the sheer size of it that drew my attention,” he noted. Checking the folders, what he uncovered was the tragic story that has been lost to collective memory.

To set the stage: In 1886, the Nairn Linoleum Co. in Scotland began buying property in Kearny. It later became Congoleum- Nairn (“Congoleum” flooring supposedly named for an asphalt saturate that came from the African Congo).

Eventually, the Congoleum- Nairn plant became a 63-acre complex that stretched along Passaic Ave. all the way from Belgrove Drive to Bergen Ave.

There was a smattering of structures on the river side of the road, but the bulk of the huge factory buildings — dozens of them — were on the east side.

(A few still remain, sandwiched between and around ShopRite and other businesses. See also the small white stone building near the gas station at Passaic and Belgrove with “1886” above the doorway we presume, but cannot prove, that was the first. Overlooking the site, atop the Belgrove cliff, is the former office headquarters, now a nursing home.)

After the U.S. entered World War II in 1941, the plant was converted to war-product manufacturing, and by August 1943, while still producing some linoleum, 75% of work involved supplying the military. Most reports say only that it was manufacturing camouflage netting, but according to Congoleum’s own website, “aerial torpedo parts and grenades” were also among its output. We note that because of the (unproven) rumors of sabotage that circulated after Aug. 19.

As the KPD report states, it was at 5:05 p.m. that an explosion occurred, one so powerful it leveled all of Building 12, a 300𴤄-foot three-story structure abutting Passaic Ave., just to the south of the plant’s main gate in the middle of the block. In Building 12 were the stoves used to dry out the camouflage netting.

In that building also were at least 30 employees. Of those, 10 would escape uninjured, seven would suffer varying degrees of injuries — and 13 would die, nine immediately, most buried under tons of “bricks, stone and twisted steel.”

Three others would die at West Hudson Hospital.

As terrible as that toll was, it could have been much worse. A news story the following day in The New York Sun stated that the disaster struck as the day and night shifts were changing. “Three hundred night workers were scheduled to enter the building not much more than 15 minutes after the explosion,” The Sun reported.

According to an Associated Press story, the explosion was so strong it “was felt over a 10-mile area,” and the KPD (which had sent all available officers to the scene) noted that plate glass windows all the way up on Kearny Ave. were among the many that had been blown out.

The Kearny police report, written by Detective Casmis Schillon, reads, “Upon our arrival . . . rubble and debris from the shattered building were all over the street and in the yard of the plant and there was a fire raging in the ruins . . .”

“Fire apparatus from Kearny, under the command of Chief Wandras, was on the scene, and immediately arrangements were made for emergency crews from Newark, Harrison and the Public Service Co. to assist…” (Schillon’s report noted “all the electrical wires on the west side of Passaic Ave. had been torn from their poles and were lying in the street, making conditions very hazardous”).

Because “tremendous crowds were gathering,” the cops had to force the mob back and rope off the area. Auxiliary police were called for crowd and traffic control.

In addition to the KPD ambulance, which was first on the scene, others were summoned from Newark City Hospital and Jersey City Medical Center.

“Fire assistance from Newark, Harrison, North Arlington and other nearby cities arrived, and local demolition squads immediately started searching the ruins for bodies,” Schillon reported.

The story in The Sun said that “low water pressure” handicapped the firemen. According to the newspaper, “Two fireboats were called from Newark and they linked their hose to that of the fire trucks, pumping water from the Passaic River” and two Coast Guard cutters equipped with firefighting apparatus also fought the blaze.

Kearny police remained on the scene as bodies were hunted, located and taken to a morgue at Fay’s Funeral Parlor in Harrison. The body of James Gageby, 45, of Elm St., North Arlington, was found on the north side of the building right after the explosion. That of James Minnis, 42, of Allen Drive, North Arlington, was found in a passageway at 6:30 p.m.

The others, their bodies all dug from the ruins over the course of two days, were: Edna Lang, 43, 10th St., Lyndhurst Pietro Verrengia, 49, Warren St., Harrison Leo Kalinowski, 32, Plane St., Newark Thomas Ertle, 48, Halstead St., Kearny Charles Katsacoulas, 26, Baylis Ave., North Arlington Dennis Maginnis, 42, Halstead St., Kearny Anthony DiDomenico, 46, Gaston Ave., Garfield, and Leslie Anderson, 37, Brighton Ave., Kearny.

The last victim was not found until 9:45 a.m. Aug. 21.

In addition, three people survived the explosion, but died later of their injuries. Edward McEntevy, 62, of Warren St., Harrison, was dug from the rubble at 7:15 p.m. Aug. 19 and died at West Hudson Hospital at 11:15 p.m.

Fred Pervin of Windsor St., a 16-year-old Kearny High School student working a summer job at the plant, had been found outside the ruins immediately after the blast he died at West Hudson at 6:45 p.m. on the 20th.

And John Pracher, 36, of William St., East Orange, also found alive on the 19th, survived at the hospital until the night of Aug. 28, finally succumbing to burns and internal injuries.

Investigators at the scene included not only the Kearny police but detectives from the Hudson County Prosecutor’s Office, the federal Bureau of Mines (we don’t know why) and the FBI, which had seven agents on site within 90 minutes. Their concern was the plant’s involvement in the war effort.

Schillon’s report notes, “We also went in among the crowds at the scene both in the yard of the plant and in the immediate vicinity trying to learn something of value pertaining to the explosion, and we also kept on the alert for suspicious persons.”

As far as local law enforcement is aware, only one person was taken into custody.

At 6:30 p.m., the police collared Czeslaw Leonard Kacperowski, 27, of Highland Ave., Kearny, who was taking pictures of the scene, in violation of a national wartime prohibition against unauthorized photography at any industrial plant manufacturing war material.

Schematic courtesy KPD
Congoleum-Nairn complex on Passaic Ave. Arrow indicates Building 12, the one destroyed in explosion.

Kacperowski, questioned by police and the FBI at KPD headquarters, gave a signed statement explaining that photography was his hobby and he had simply grabbed his camera when he heard the blast, saw the smoke and joined the people running in that direction. He was fingerprinted and released without charges, but the FBI confiscated his camera and film. The KPD still has the receipt. But, as Wilgus commented, “We have no idea what happened to him.”

This is because the FBI took over the entire Congoleum case, and the feds have never reported back to the KPD on what, if anything, was the resolution. Which is why all this information is still on file at HQ. Plus, “we can never get rid of any record that involves deaths,” Wilgus explained.

Congoleum-Nairn hired its own investigator, Dr. Harold Brown, an expert on explosives who was formerly with the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

In addition to heat-drying the camo netting, The Sun reported, other workers in the demolished “stove building” were manufacturing linoleum [for battleships]. Along with The Sun, AP said the cause of the blast was thought to be caused by cork and linoleum dust and noted that toxic gases generated by burning cork, linoleum and shellac had overcome several firefighters.

Brown’s official finding? He thought it began on the stove floor and “was caused by a concentration of explosive vapors ignited by a spark of unknown origin.”

Succinct but hardly conclusive.

Rumors of possible sabotage remained, fueled by the fact that a number of other war-material plants had been the scene of similar disasters. The FBI had also been called in on Sept. 12, 1940, more than a year before Pearl Harbor, to investigate a munitions plant explosion that killed 51 people in Kenvil, N.J.

During the war, explosions also rocked war-related factories in such places as Burlington, Iowa (one in December 1941, one in March ‘42) Versailles, Pa. (May ‘42) Stockton, Calif. (June ‘42) Coalmont, Ind. (November ‘42) Marcus Hook, Pa. (August ‘44). There were likely others.

Wilgus told us that some World War II records held in Washington had been sealed for 100 years. We do not know if the Congoleum- Nairn disaster is among those. If it isn’t, we (and the KPD) would be interested in learning what the FBI’s official findings were. Was there a conclusive resolution as to the cause? Were there any arrests or was the determination that the explosion was accidental?

Last week, The Observer contacted the FBI’s Newark office, provided the names of all the federal agents who had been involved in the case and asked for any available information. We have been told that our query was forwarded to agency’s media office and history department in Washington. And we must file a FOIL (Freedom of Information Law), request which shall be done.


DuPont Mansions in Delaware

Wooded groves and rolling hills dominate the landscape. Stately homes stand at the end of long, curving driveways, each nestled in an embrace of trees. Things seem just a bit more genteel, sedate and refined, like a vision of the English countryside tucked away in our memories.

This is 𠇌hateau Country,” Delaware’s most exclusive region and for generations the home of the DuPont family and its grand mansions. Today, many of those spectacular homes and their stunning gardens are open to visitors, giving travelers a peek into a long-lost world of splendor and beauty.

For travelers, three mansions in particular stand as must-see museums, each with its own personality and charm: Nemours (known for its formal elegance) Winterthur (for its expansive gardens and antique collection) and Hagley (for the story it tells of the DuPont legacy):

Nemours Estate stands like a little slice of Old World European royalty, complete with rare French 18th century furniture and formal French gardens that offer a dramatic view past gilded statues and sparkling fountains toward the main house. ਋uilt by Alfred du Pont for his wife shortly after they married in 1907, 102-room Nemours is inspired by Versailles’ Petit Trianon, the Neoclassical mansion in which Marie Antoinette found refuge from the court of Louis XVI.

Winterthur Museum, Garden and Library is perhaps the grandest in scope and inspiration, thanks to its 60 acres of naturalistic gardens and its 175 room displays featuring 85,000 objects, all focusing on specific periods of the decorative arts. The magic extends to the grounds, where visitors ride open tram cars through the meticulously designed gardens, and children romp through the magical Enchanted Woods. The lush hills erupt with blossoms each spring, inviting visitors to wander the flower-filled trails. 

Hagley Museum and Library is where the du Pont story began by the banks of the Brandywine River. Today, the restored riverside gunpowder mills and workers’ quarters present a picture of early American industry. The original DuPont family home and gardens still stand perched on the banks of the river.


Roman Aqueducts

The Roman aqueducts supplied fresh, clean water for baths, fountains, and drinking water for ordinary citizens.

Anthropology, Archaeology, Social Studies, World History

Pont du Gard Aqueduct

This is the Roman aqueduct of Pont du Gard, which crosses the Gard River, France. It is a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

Robert Harding Picture Library

The Roman aqueduct was a channel used to transport fresh water to highly populated areas. Aqueducts were amazing feats of engineering given the time period. Though earlier civilizations in Egypt and India also built aqueducts, the Romans improved on the structure and built an extensive and complex network across their territories. Evidence of aqueducts remain in parts of modern-day France, Spain, Greece, North Africa, and Turkey.

Aqueducts required a great deal of planning. They were made from a series of pipes, tunnels, canals, and bridges. Gravity and the natural slope of the land allowed aqueducts to channel water from a freshwater source, such as a lake or spring, to a city. As water flowed into the cities, it was used for drinking, irrigation, and to supply hundreds of public fountains and baths.

Roman aqueduct systems were built over a period of about 500 years, from 312 B.C. to A.D. 226. Both public and private funds paid for construction. High-ranking rulers often had them built the Roman emperors Augustus, Caligula, and Trajan all ordered aqueducts built.

The most recognizable feature of Roman aqueducts may be the bridges constructed using rounded stone arches. Some of these can still be seen today traversing European valleys. However, these bridged structures made up only a small portion of the hundreds of kilometers of aqueducts throughout the empire. The capital in Rome alone had around 11 aqueduct systems supplying freshwater from sources as far as 92 km away (57 miles). Despite their age, some aqueducts still function and provide modern-day Rome with water. The Aqua Virgo, an aqueduct constructed by Agrippa in 19 B.C. during Augustus&rsquo reign, still supplies water to Rome&rsquos famous Trevi Fountain in the heart of the city.

This is the Roman aqueduct of Pont du Gard, which crosses the Gard River, France. It is a UNESCO World Heritage Site.


Du Pont heiress paints unflattering picture of Wilm. Trust

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The Wilmington Trust building in downtown Wilmington is shown on March 9, 2010. A du Pont heiress wants a court to remove the organization as trustee of four trusts created for her benefit. (Photo: SUCHAT PEDERSON/THE NEWS JOURNAL) Buy Photo

A du Pont family heiress is asking a Delaware court to remove the once family-controlled Wilmington Trust Co. as trustee of four trusts created for her benefit, alleging the bank made imprudent investments, unjustly enriched itself and disclosed personal and confidential information to other distant family members.

Anne du Pont Shirley of Rembert, South Carolina, has petitioned Chancery Court to appoint PNC Bank as trustee and to reimburse payments garnished from the trusts by Wilmington Trust for the benefit of its parent company, M&T Bank Corp.

A spokesman for Wilmington Trust and M&T did not return a request to comment.

Shirley is the daughter of the late Lammot du Pont Jr., a great-great grandson of the founder of the DuPont Co. At the time of his death in 1964, Lammot du Pont was an assistant vice president of Wilmington Trust, a bank created by his family members in 1903.

Shirley’s grandfather, Lammot du Pont, was the eighth family member to head the chemical company and led the company through the commercialization of Lucite and nylon. Lammot du Pont’s brother, Pierre S. du Pont of Longwood, was one of the first directors of Wilmington Trust.

Lammot du Pont created trusts in 1941 for the benefit of his son, Lammot Jr. and his son’s descendants with Wilmington Trust as trustee. In addition, Margaret F. du Pont, Lammot’s wife, created trusts in 1954 with Wilmington Trust as trustee to benefit Lammot Jr.’s descendants.

According to the petition, Wilmington Trust invested trust money in various illiquid funds, including Wilmington Real Estate Managers Fund Select LLC, without sending proper notice and disclosures to Shirley. The bank has “not met with Anne in years to discuss the investment allocation or performance” of the trusts, the petition alleges.

Yet, Wilmington Trust “unjustly enriched” itself by charging a management fee for the illiquid investments, for which the investments also charged a management fee, the petition alleges.

Wilmington Trust is also trustee of a 1976 trust, called Anne A. DeM. Du Pont Revocable Trust that was created by Shirley, according to court papers. It is currently valued at $2.5 million, the petition says. In 1997, Shirley borrowed $2.3 million from Wilmington Trust that was later secured by the assets in the trust and a mortgage on Shirley’s property in South Carolina known as “Ice House.”

After Wilmington Trust was sold to M&T in 2011 the loan documents were assigned to M&T, the petition says. According to the petition, Wilmington Trust improperly garnished payments from Shirley’s other trusts to pay down the note.

“The onerous terms of the note, combined with the lack of Anne’s ability to remove Wilmington Trust and Wilmington Trust’s illiquid and nontransferable investments…put Anne in a vulnerable position subject to the whims of Wilmington Trust, and later, M&T,” the petition says.

Wilmington Trust extended the note to Shirley for the “sole purpose of generating additional income,” from its relationship with Shirley, the petition alleges.

Beginning last year, M&T began to “aggressively” pressure to Shirley to pay off the note. Then in early 2015, M&T made it clear it was going to demand full payment of the loan by the end of June 2015, despite Shirley’s “exemplary payment pattern and M&T’s more than adequate collateral, and without any explanation or justification,” the petition says. After discussions, M&T agreed in March to give Shirley 90 days to pay off the loan if Shirley agreed to pay down the note by $575,000 on by April 24.

“Fortunately, Anne was able to secure a commitment to refinance the entire ($) 2.3 million note from WSFS Bank,” the petition says. “Ann repaid the note in full on May 29, 2015.”

M&T charged Shirley almost $17,000 for its attorney fees in connection with demanding repayment of the note, the petition alleges.

“… Anne had no choice but to pay in order for M&T to release its liens on the collateral necessary for the refinancing,” the petition says.

In her petition, Shirley alleges Wilmington Trust is unfit, unwilling or unable to administer the trusts properly. Hostility between the bank and Shirley “threatens the administration” of the trusts, the petition says.

Shirley is asking the court to require Wilmington Trust to disgorge all fees paid and profits earned in connection with the investments in the trusts and reimburse the trust for the bank’s imprudent investments.

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Watch the video: USS DUPONT DD-941 1982 (January 2022).