History Podcasts

Gloster Meteor FR Mk.9 in flight

Gloster Meteor FR Mk.9 in flight


We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.

A view of the Gloster Meteor FR Mk.9, the armed low level reconnaissance version of the aircraft. This shot clearly shows the camera windows in the nose and the cannon.

Gloster Meteor, Britain's Celebrated First-Generation Jet, Phil Butler and Tony Buttler. This is a detailed, well illustrated and well written look at the development and service history of the Gloster Meteor, both in British and overseas hands. The book covers the development of the E.28/39, Britain's first jet aircraft and the development of the Meteor, looks in detail at the prototype aircraft, the various versions of the Meteor and its British and overseas service careers. [see more]


Gloster Meteor FR Mk.9 in flight - History

Corgi Aviation Archive Collector Series
AA35009 Gloster Meteor F.Mk 9 Diecast Model
RAF No. 208 Sqn, RAF Nicosia, Cyprus, 1956

With grateful thanks to Doug Johns is a rare colour photograph of ‘O’ Oscar, which has appeared in FlyPast Magazine and was also a limited- edition model produced by Corgi of a 208 Squadron Meteor 9.

This suberb model is one of the Corgi 50th Anniversary celebration models. The very low production run of only 500 means that this will be extremely hard to find in years to come. Complete with optional undercarriage and airbrake positions, this is a De- Certificated model, which means the certificate has been removed and the box annotated to denote the fact.

Corgi’s own advertisement states the following:

With the arrival of the Meteors in Cyprus came new squadron markings of bars flanking the roundels comprising sky blue and yellow horizontal bands, denoting the “sky and the desert". These markings are still carried today on the Squadron’s Hawk aircraft at RAF Valley, Anglesey.

Designed as a turbojet- powered fighter in a time when piston- engined aircraft still dominated the skies, the Gloster Meteor first flew on March 5, 1943. The Meteor was the first British jet fighter and the only Allied jet aircraft to see service during WWII. It debuted around the same time as the German Me 262, but was not used for dogfighting – instead, Meteors were used to combat the V1 Flying Bomb. The Meteor’s service during WWII was limited, but it saw combat during the Korean war and was used by the Royal Australian Air Force and by the Air Forces of more than a dozen other nations until its ultimate retirement in the 1970s.

Corgi’s 1:72 scale Meteor series includes both early and late variants of the F. Mk 8. The early F8 variant features longer engine nacelles and obstructed visibility behind the pilot, with the latter featuring shorter engine nacelles with a larger intake and a full canopy. Four 20mm cannon guns - the aircraft’s main weapons – are visible just below the cockpit.


No. 1417 (General Reconnaissance) Flight (1417 (GR) Flt) was first formed at RAF St. Athan, from No. 417 (General Reconnaissance) Flight, on 1 March 1941 as a General Reconnaissance unit, flying Avro Anson I aircraft on maritime patrols. The flight had a very short life, being disbanded on 18 March 1941. [1]

No. 1417 (Leigh Light Trials) Flight (1417 (LLT) Flt) was a Royal Air Force flight established to carry out trials and develop tactics for the use of ASV Radar/Leigh Light equipped Vickers Wellington GR Mk VIII maritime reconnaissance-bombers. Formed on 8 January 1942 at RAF Chivenor 1417 (LLT) Flt was re-formed as No. 172 Squadron from 4 April 1942 onwards. [2] [3]

No. 1417 (Communication) Flight (1417 (Comms) Flt) was re-incarnated on 1 November 1953, as a communications unit in the Middle East, at RAF Muharraq, Bahrain with Avro Anson XIX and Percival Pembroke C.1 aircraft. Once again (1417 Flt) formed the basis of a full squadron when No. 152 Squadron was formed at Bahrain on 1 October 1958 under the command of Flight Lieutenant F. Rimmer, flying Percival Pembroke C Mk.1 transport aircraft. [4]

From 1956 Gloster Meteor FR Mk.9 aircraft from No. 208 Squadron were deployed to Aden for operations against rebel tribesmen and Yemeni insurgents. This Squadron was withdrawn at the time of the Suez Crisis, but some aircraft returned from 1958 to 1960 operated by the Arabian Peninsular Reconnaissance Flight. [5]

The reconnaissance task at Aden was taken over by No. 8 Squadron from 1960, flying Hawker Hunter FGA Mk.9 and FR Mk.10 aircraft. Lack-lustre results from reconnaissance missions and difficulties maintaining the aircraft prompted the formation of a dedicated reconnaissance flight on 1 March 1963 as No. 1417 (Fighter Reconnaissance) Flight (1417 (FR) Flt), flying the five FR Mk.10 Hunters from No. 8 Squadron and a T Mk.7 two seat Hunter. [6]

The five aircraft were given tactical codes to represent the initials of the five pilots: RP for Roger Pyrah, JM for Johnny Morris, PL for Peter Lewis, JD for Jim Dymond and GT for Geoff Timms. (Timms was to carry on flying fast jets well into his sixties, becoming probably the oldest active fast-jet pilot in the RAF, until retiring to the Harrier Simulator at RAF Wittering in the early 1990s.) [7]

March 1965 was a busy month with the pilots, ground-crew and aircraft of No. 8 Squadron, plus two 1417 Flt FR.10s departing Khormaksar for a two-week detachment to RAF Masirah, an island in the Gulf of Oman, to undergo strike and photo reconnaissance training in an area not familiar to many pilots. The detachment left on 8 March 1965 and returned on 19 March 1965.

The following table of flying hours, for Khormaksar aircraft in March 1965, illustrates that the Hunter FR Mk.10's of 1417 (FR) Flt were well utilised, with each aircraft averaging well over 20 hours flying for that month.

Aircraft type Allocation Hours flown [8]
Hunter FGA.9 25 662.35
Hunter FR.10 5 116.40
Hunter T.7 3 78.25
Shackleton MR.2 4 190.00
Total flying hours 1,047.40

A typical month saw 1417 (FR) Flt fly 63 reconnaissance missions in June 1964, which was quite an achievement considering there were only five pilots and five aircraft, with some on standby duty at up-country airfields and other normal flying and training being carried out simultaneously.

1417 (FR) Flt continued providing pre- and post-strike reconnaissance up to the draw-down of British forces in Aden. Missions were carried out on a daily basis until it was disbanded and re-absorbed into No. 8 Squadron on 8 September 1967, shortly after evacuating to RAF Muharraq at Bahrain. [9] [10] [11]

In 1975, with Guatemala in the grip of a bloody civil war, there was a real fear that Guatemalan forces might invade Belize and at the very least widen their Caribbean coastline. To bolster the resident British Army garrison, a detachment of six Hawker Siddeley Harrier GR.1As from No. 1 Squadron was sent to Belize international airport at Ladyville in November 1975. There they set about waving the flag and discouraging Guatemalan aggression. After several months the threat was perceived to have subsided and the Harriers returned to the UK in April 1976, only to return on a more permanent basis in June 1977, as part of a complete package with the Queen's Regiment of the British Army. A Vickers VC10 C1 and six Harriers from No. 1 Squadron flew direct with support from ten Handley Page Victor tankers. [12]

Hardet Belize Edit

Thus was born HarDet Belize the six aircraft were operated from semi-permanent hides, named using the NATO phonetic alphabet. Alpha and Bravo hides were set up in the grounds of the Belikin brewery outside the gates to the garrison Charlie and Delta hides were set up on the other side of the garrison access road. Echo hide either never existed or formed the basis of the Tie-down engine running pan at the eastern end of the runway. Foxy (contracted from Foxtrot) and Golf hides were set up around the airport fire station (which remained active), even using some of the fire station buildings. Hotel, India and Juliet hides were arranged around the access taxiway to Williamson Hangar and the edge of the airport apron.

No. 1417 (Tactical Ground Attack) Flight Edit

After operating as a rotating roulement for two years, HarDet was put on an even more permanent footing with the formation of No. 1417 (Tactical Ground Attack) Flight (1417 (TGA) Flt) from 18 April 1980 until closure on 6 July 1993. [1] Much flying was done, with plenty of flag-waving and sabre-rattling, the aircrew enjoying the post due to the lack of restrictions, and challenging missions. [13] Eventually operations were confined to Charlie/Delta and Foxy/Golf hides which went through a slow metamorphosis to permanent semi-hardened hides with concrete surfaces and taxi-ways and block built buildings (including accommodation, kitchen and bars).

Several aircraft were lost due to various reasons, but one of the most spectacular incidents occurred when some months prior to the formation of 1417 Flight XZ132 encountered a large vulture which tore straight through the bird-strike armour in the intake, making a large hole in the starboard forward fuselage fuel tank. The contents of the fuel system promptly gushed out of this hole, causing a large cloud of fuel vapour as the aircraft approached to land. After stopping on the runway, the pilot could see the damage caused by the vulture and said he would have ejected if he had known the extent of the damage. XZ132 was sent back to the UK, repaired, and sent off to war in the Falkland Islands, albeit with a leaking front tank.

Date Aircraft serial no. Crash location Cause [14]
1 December 1975 XV788 Engine problems due to bird strike
26 May 1981 XW923 Belize River Loss of control during short take-off
14 July 1981 XV807 Georgeville CFIT (Controlled Flight into Terrain)

Harriers of 1417 (TGA) Flt were also instrumental in securing diplomatic assurances for the future of Belize, after taking part in air shows at La Aurora International Airport, Guatemala City, for the 69th and 70th anniversaries of the Guatemalan Air Force, in 1990 and 1991, supported by a Westland Puma HC.1 from No. 1563 Flight.


About Just Flight

Based in the United Kingdom, Just Flight, owned by Mastertronic Group has been in the simulation business since the early days of FS2000. Developing in-house creations and publishing flight sim add-ons from third-party developers for various platforms including MSFS, X-Plane, and Prepar3D.

Their latest focus has been on the next-gen platforms including P3Dv5 and Microsoft's latest flight simulator, MSFS (2020) release.

Trusted by thousands of flight simmers worldwide, Just Flight is a household name in flight simulation.


Gloster Meteor Mk.4 “World Speed Record” 1:72

The very first British jet engine-powered fighter to see operational service was the Gloster Meteor. Following the wartime Meteor Mk.Is and Mk.IIIs, the production line gave also the post war Mk.4 version with much better performance. On 7 November 1945, two Meteor Mk.3s rebuilt to a Mk.4 standard were used to attempt the World Speed Record. The RAF High Speed Flight Meteors serialled EE454 and EE455 were flown by RAF’s Group Captain Hugh Joseph Wilson, CBE, AFC and Two Bars and Gloster Chief Test Pilot Eric Stanley Greenwood. Wilson, flying the camouflaged EE454 was few more miles faster that Greenwood in (almost) all-yellow EE455, having raised the record to 975.68 kmh. Less than a year later, Gp Capt E M (Teddy) Donaldson in a Meteor serialled EE549 set up a new record of 991.33 kmh and in January 1947, the very same machine also raised the Paris-London speed record.

The kit comprises two styrene sprues and a clear injected canopy, a fret of photo-etched engine air intake meshes, adhesive masks for various style canopies (incl. the special high speed metal canopy with small transparent portholes) and a decal sheet for record breaking machines serialled EE454, EE455 and EE549. The latter is depicted in two various colour schemes (camouflaged and all-blue) and what may be most interesting, with two various styles of her outer wing panels as later during the career, she was seen fitted with a standard Mk.4 short span wing.

Maker: Special Hobby

Known Price: £16.99

Release Date: May 2017

Event Date: 7th November 1945

Paint Schemes:

Gloster Meteor EE455 ‘Yellow Peril’ as flown by Gloster Chief Test Pilot Eric Greenwood, attacked the World Speed Record and reached 603 mph at the course at Reculver. Used Manston for a base for the attempt.

Gloster Meteor EE454 ‘Britania’ as flown by Wing Commander Hugh Joseph Wilson, setting the World Speed Record of 606.36 mph at the course at Reculver. Used Manston for a base for the attempt.

Gloster Meteor EE549 flown by Group Captain E.M. Donaldson who reached 616 mph on 7 September 1946.

Gloster Meteor EE549 which set a new Paris-London record of 520 mph in November 1946. Now on display at the Tangmere Military Aviation Museum (on loan from the RAF Museum).


Just Flight - Meteor F.8/FR.9

Although the Gloster Meteor is regarded as typical of Britain's Jet Age supremacy, its development actually began in the dark days of 1940 and the design, although quite primitive, turned out to be a successful fighter and evolved quickly through the 1940s and 1950s. Although the aircraft saw only limited combat in WWII, nearly 4,000 airframes were built in a variety of specifications, including ground attack and photo-reconnaissance, and served with many countries. Meteors flew as night-fighters, trainers and ejection-seat test-beds. An F.3 set the world's first official air speed record for a jet aircraft on 7th November 1945 at 606 miles per hour. The following year an F.4 extended this record to 616 miles per hour. One Meteor, fitted with Rolls-Royce Trent turbines driving propellers, even became the world's first turboprop aircraft to take to the air.

Although quickly eclipsed by the stars of the late 50s and 60s, the Gloster Meteor will always hold its position in the history of aviation as the UK's first operational jet fighter.

This FSX/P3D collection includes models of the F.8 fighter and the FR.9 fighter-reconnaissance variants, in a total of 12 liveries. The detailed virtual cockpit features simple autopilot functionality, simulated UV cockpit lighting and a retractable reticle gunsight. Other features include selectable wing fuel tanks or wing-mounted (non-operational) rockets (rockets non-operational), an authentic sound set and selectable identification light colors.

Features

  • Accurate and detailed versions of the F.8 fighter and FR.9 fighter-reconnaissance variants
  • Detailed cockpit
  • 12 high quality liveries and a Paint Kit (166MB) is available to download
  • Authentic sounds
  • Retractable reticle gunsight
  • Selectable wing fuel tanks or wing-mounted rocket load-outs (rockets non-operational)
  • Simulated UV cockpit lighting
  • Selectable colours for identification lights
  • Simple autopilot function available
  • Easy to operate and fly
  • External battery cart
  • Full animations
  • PDF manual that includes a tutorial at Gloucester Staverton Airport on the operation and handling of the aircraft.

Compatible with Flight Simulator X (Acceleration, Gold or SP2 required), FSX: Steam Edition or P3D v1/v2/v3.


Just Flight - Meteor F.8/FR.9

Although the Gloster Meteor is regarded as typical of Britain's Jet Age supremacy, its development actually began in the dark days of 1940 and the design, although quite primitive, turned out to be a successful fighter and evolved quickly through the 1940s and 1950s. Although the aircraft saw only limited combat in WWII, nearly 4,000 airframes were built in a variety of specifications, including ground attack and photo-reconnaissance, and served with many countries. Meteors flew as night-fighters, trainers and ejection-seat test-beds. An F.3 set the world's first official air speed record for a jet aircraft on 7th November 1945 at 606 miles per hour. The following year an F.4 extended this record to 616 miles per hour. One Meteor, fitted with Rolls-Royce Trent turbines driving propellers, even became the world's first turboprop aircraft to take to the air.

Although quickly eclipsed by the stars of the late 50s and 60s, the Gloster Meteor will always hold its position in the history of aviation as the UK's first operational jet fighter.

This FSX/P3D collection includes models of the F.8 fighter and the FR.9 fighter-reconnaissance variants, in a total of 12 liveries. The detailed virtual cockpit features simple autopilot functionality, simulated UV cockpit lighting and a retractable reticle gunsight. Other features include selectable wing fuel tanks or wing-mounted (non-operational) rockets (rockets non-operational), an authentic sound set and selectable identification light colors.

Features

  • Accurate and detailed versions of the F.8 fighter and FR.9 fighter-reconnaissance variants
  • Detailed cockpit
  • 12 high quality liveries and a Paint Kit (166MB) is available to download
  • Authentic sounds
  • Retractable reticle gunsight
  • Selectable wing fuel tanks or wing-mounted rocket load-outs (rockets non-operational)
  • Simulated UV cockpit lighting
  • Selectable colours for identification lights
  • Simple autopilot function available
  • Easy to operate and fly
  • External battery cart
  • Full animations
  • PDF manual that includes a tutorial at Gloucester Staverton Airport on the operation and handling of the aircraft.

Compatible with Flight Simulator X (Acceleration, Gold or SP2 required), FSX: Steam Edition or P3D v1/v2/v3.


Warbird Tails What If – ME262 Vs Gloster Meteor

The first part of this what if series took a little imagination, it saw two German WW1 fighters in hypothetical combat. This made for an interesting, if unlikely comparison.

Todays situation is one that was much more likely to come to pass and would have presented the first jet against jet dogfight in history. While the ME262 and Meteor both saw service at the end of the Second World War, restrictions on the use of the Meteor meant that the two types never came across each other before VE day. This post will look at the specifications of each aircraft, along with pilots accounts to see which aircraft might have come out on top.

The Race for Jet Powered Flight

As detailed in this post from last year, the first British jet powered aircraft, the Gloster E28/39, took to the skies on the 15th May 1941 marking the start of a new chapter for aviation development. It would take near enough two more years before the first production jet powered aircraft took to the skies.

That would be another Gloster product, the Meteor. Prototype DG202/G (now on display the Royal Air Force Museum Hendon) first flew on the 5th March 1943. It would not be until July the following year that any front line squadrons took delivery of Gloster’s straight wing jet. The jets were initially based at Manston before moving to airbases in Europe, such was the secrecy of the design however, the Meteor was not allowed over German territory under any circumstances.

On the other side of the war, the Germans were ahead of the British in terms of Jet Powered flight. The eccentric Heinkel He178 had taken to the skies in August 1939, before the war had even started, giving the German design teams a head start on the development of high speed aircraft. The first German jet fighter, the Messerschmitt ME262 was under development as early as 1939 as well and it would ultimately complete its first flight a year ahead of the Gloster fighter, though it only entered service a few months earlier.

Looking at the two aircraft side by side, which is now easily done at the Royal Air Force Museum London, the differences are obvious. Germany clearly had high speed flight in their sights at a very early stage. The swept wing design of the 262 was way ahead of its time in comparison to the Meteor, Vampire and P-59 Airacomet, which the allies were developing. This wing sweep actually only came about due to the weight of the original BMW engines lined up for the fighter, the wing sweep was necessary in order to keep the Centre of Gravity in the correct position.

The 262 was originally planned to be powered by BMW 003 engines but these were plagued with problems, including a double engine failure during an early test flying attempt. Ultimately the Jumo 004 engine was selected, this presented a very different profile to the british engine designs, the latter being short bulky designs in comparison to the sleek profile of the Jumo. The Jumo engine was famously never particularly reliable with the best case scenario lifetime being around 50 hours, in practice pilots were lucky if they got as many as 20 hours before the engines needed a complete rebuild.

Where the German engines fell down was in the fact that the materials used within the engine could not withstand the heat generated by the engine. Whittle’s engine designs handled this better and as a result had an expected life in excess of 100 hours.

The ME262 A1a – the “definitive” version of the fighter, could reach a top speed of 559mph and reach over 37,000 feet a truly remarkable achievement in the middle of World War 2. By comparison to these figures the first production Meteors could only reach around 450mph albeit they could break the 40,000ft mark.

The Messerschmitt certainly saw more combat during the Second World War than the Meteor and the huge jump in speed initially proved to be a problem for the German pilots of the time. They were simply too fast to use traditional air warfare methods, with closing speeds, particularly on bombers being too high to achieve any consistent hits. Alternative methods were soon developed notably the “slashing” technique whereby the jets would dive diagonally across a formation of bombers, giving the best opportunity to land a hit on the enemy aircraft. Once this technique had been established the ME262s started to pose a real threat to the allied war effort. The faster piston aircraft of the day, such as the Hawker Tempest were still well below the top speed of the German jet, however they soon realised they could easily pick the jets off during their landing phase and would often wait for the 262s to return from their missions and pick them off on approach. One of the limitations of these early jets is the poor throttle responses, in the case of the Jumo 004 quick throttle adjustments could also result in engine failure of fire so the pilots really were sitting ducks once established on approach.

The Meteor, had a comparatively quiet and secretive service during the Second World War – being kept back in the UK to deal with the V1 threat, something which the jet saw great success in. As commented above once it was moved to the continent it was not allowed over the German lines and as such saw limited combat. The Meteor had very little speed advantage over the piston engine aircraft of the day and early versions did not handle particularly well either.

The 262 was certainly the faster of the two aircraft, it was already closing in on the 600mph mark while the Meteor could barely break 450mph, a part of this was no doubt due to the wing sweep in place on the 262.

Where the Meteor did have the advantage was with reliability, the Powerjet engines installed in the Gloster could run for longer without the need for a total strip back and were less sensitive to throttle movements unlike its German counterpart.

Had there not been such concern on both sides that their secret jet weapons would fall into the hands of their enemies it would not have been so unlikely for the Meteor and ME262 to meet in combat. Like so many things it seems quite inevitable that had the war continued the two aircraft would have met sooner or later.

Based on the technical data and practical experience covered above it certainly suggests that the ME262 would have come out on top more often than not. It certainly would have had the option of simply turning and running away from the fight, having an advantage of 100mph over the British fighter. However, the main German fighting tactic with the 262 was using an extreme speed advantage over bombers and slower piston engine fighters. They had no experience of jet to jet air combat which means new techniques would have to be carried out. While against unmanned aircraft, the British pilots would at least have their experience of intercepting the V1 Flying Bombs to draw on and while the Meteor could not outrun the faster pistons of the day it did have a more consistent top speed at all heights which would have worked to its advantage.

The Meteor could, theoretically have out-climbed the 262 as well, with a higher ceiling, this could have been put to good use in what would no doubt be high level combat. While a lot is made of the speed differences of the initial Meteor and the 262 it is worth noting that a modified F3 broke the world speed record in 1946 with a speed of 606mph, showing that there was potential for the Meteor to develop had it needed to under wartime conditions.

It certainly would have proved an interesting battle had the two types come across each other in 1945, the type of combat required had not been tested at the time and it would have put very different strains on the aircraft and pilots, it may well have been the unpredictable nature of the Jumo 004s would have been the undoing of the Messerschmitt in comparison with the Meteor. Certainly with the potential of allied fighters patrolling home bases it is likely that the 262 would still have suffered great losses.

Ultimately the difference in the development of these types could perhaps be summed up when put in context with what was required. Germany was desperate, in a difficult position and losing ground, they needed a fast powerful aeroplane in quick time, as such the 262 was developed at an accelerated rate, resulting in engine design problems. The Meteor was not treated as such an urgent priority once it proved capable of dealing with the V1 threat as the allies already had a strong position by the time it was ready for active service. I have no doubt that if the tables were turned we would have seen the Meteor develop much faster. Certainly an interesting thought and a very possible “What If?”


GLOSTER METEOR

The Meteor was born in 1940 when, following some years of jet engine development led by Frank Whittle, the Air Ministry issued its request for an operational turbojet powered aircraft. It was Gloster’s chief engineer, George Carter, who proposed a twin-engine aircraft. Twelve prototypes were ordered in February 1941 – initially designated the Thunderbolt, the aircraft’s name was changed in 1942 to Meteor in order to preclude confusion with the new Republic P-47.

The first Meteor (the fifth prototype), flew on 5th March 1943 and the first production aircraft, the F1, on 12th January 1944. The Mk 1, armed with 4 x 20mm Hispano cannon, entered RAF service in June 1944 with No 616 Squadron and was immediately pressed into service against the V-1 flying bomb it was the first British jet fighter and the only allied jet fighter to see service in the Second World War. At the end of 1944, the F1s were replaced with the more highly-powered F3 version.

The F4, powered by Derwent engines, first flew in the summer of 1945 shortly after VE Day. In the aftermath of war, the RAF re-worked several of these aircraft, with a reduction in wingspan being perhaps the main feature. The High Speed Flight was established at RAF Tangmere, and it was on 7 September 1946, exactly 60 years ago, that Gp Capt Teddy Donaldson took off in Meteor EE549 from Tangmere to set a new world air speed record of 616 mph.

The tandem-seat T7 trainer followed, and then came the F8 which first flew in 1948 and, equipped with the more powerful Derwent 8 engines, became the mainstay of Fighter Command through to 1955 when it was progressively replaced by the Hawker Hunter. The F8 also saw service with No 77 Squadron, Royal Australian Air Force in Korea. It had some initial success against the superior Mig-15 in air-to-air combat but after six months (and the loss of four aircraft in a single day) was transferred to the ground attack role. A total of 1550 F8s were built.

The Meteor NF11 to NF14 series of night/all-weather fighters was based on the T7, with an extended nose to accommodate its AI radar, and introduced into service as an interim measure pending the arrival of the Gloster Javelin. The first NF11s entered service in the early 1950s and the night fighter versions remained on the RAF front line until 1961.

Almost 4000 Meteors were built in total. In addition to the RAF, the aircraft also saw service with the RAAF as already mentioned and the air forces of Argentina, Belgium, Brazil, Denmark, Ecuador, Egypt, France, Israel, New Zealand, Sweden, Syria and The Netherlands.

Tangmere Museum’s Meteor F8 (WA829) served on No245 Squadron as one of the 16 Meteor F8s modified to undertake flight-refuelling trials. Donaldson’s record-breaking Meteor F4 (EE549) is currently on loan from the RAF Museum by courtesy of the Trustees.


Gloster Meteor In Flight 1946

Cuts from newsreel 46/57 - Jet speed plane at Tangmere Airfield in Sussex.

Description

Unissued / unused footage - locations and dates may be unclear / unknown.

Cuts from newsreel 46/57 - Jet speed plane.

Various shots of RAF / Royal Air Force pilots - Wing Commander Donaldson, Squadron Leader Waterton and Flight Lieutenant Duke - as they are interviewed by Pathe, standing beside the jet Gloster Meteor plane. Waterton climbs into cockpit of the plane. Plane taxis and takes off.

Various shots of the plane in flight, landing, taking off.

Waterton gets out of plane after landing. Shots showing details of plane. Shots of the men standing about and talking. A WAAF puts her hand to her eyes to shield them from the sun as she watches the plane in flight.

Several air to air shots of the plane flying over the sea and coastline.

  • Tangmere
  • airfields
  • Sussex
  • RAF
  • R.A.F.
  • Royal
  • Air
  • Force
  • Wing
  • Commander
  • Edward
  • Donaldson
  • jets
  • aeroplanes
  • Squadron
  • Leader
  • Bill
  • Waterton
  • Neville
  • Duke
  • Pathe
  • Gloster
  • Meteor
  • WAAF
  • Womens
  • Auxiliary
  • Air
  • Force

Comments (2)

"Gloucester Meteor" in the title should read Gloster Meteor.

"Wing Commander Donaldson" is Edward "Teddy" Donaldson.



Comments:

  1. Mazulmaran

    What a success!

  2. Mareo

    I can speak a lot on this issue.

  3. Zulkikree

    Let's get back to the topic



Write a message