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USS Northampton CL-26 - History

USS Northampton CL-26 - History


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USS Northampton CL-26

Northampton II
(CL-26: dp. 9 050, 1. 600'3", b. 66'1" dr. 16'4", s. 32.5 k. cpl. 621; a. 9 81', 4 5", 8.50 eat mg., 6 2;" tt.; cl. Northampton)

Northampton (CL 26) was laid down 12 April 1928 by Bethlehem Steel Corp., Quincy, Mass.; launched 5 September 1929; sponsored by Mrs. Calvin Coolidge, and commissioned 17 May 1930, Captain Walter N. Vernou in command.

Joining the Atlantic Fleet, Northampton made a shakedown cruise to the Mediterranean during the sllmmer of 1930, then participated in the fleet training schedule which took her to the Caribbean, the Canal Zone, and, occasionally, into the Pacific for exercises with other cruisers and ships of all types. Redesignated CA-26 in 1931, she operated primarily in the Pacific from 1932, homeported at San Pedro, and later at Pearl Harbor.

Northampton was at sea with Admiral William Halsey in Enterpriee during the Japanese attack 7 December 1941, returning to Pearl Harbor the next day. On the 9th the force sortied to search northeast of Oahu, then swept south to Johnston Island, then north again to hunt the enemy west of Lisianski and Midway. Through January 1942 Northampton joined in such searches until detached with SaIt Lake City to bombard Wotie 1 February. The bombardment not only demolished buildings and fuel dumps on the island, but also sank two Japanese ships. A similar assault was fired against Wake 24 February when despite serious enemy counterfire, the guns of Northampton and her force started large fires on the island and sank a dredge in the lagoon. As North ampton retired from the island, enemy sea-planes, landbased planes, and patrol craft attacked, but all were destroyed or repulsed.

On 4 March, the force launched aircraft for a strike on Mareus, then turned east for Pearl Harbor. Early in April the Enterpriee force, Northampton a member, sortied once again, and joined the Hornet force for the "Shangri-La" raid on Tokyo 18 April. Once again the ships replenished at Pearl Harbor, then sailed for the Southwest Pacific, arriving just after the Battle of the Coral Sea. Returning to Pearl Harbor Northampton prepared for the action soon to eome at Midway, when she screened lYnterprise. On 4 and 5 June the American carriers launched their planes to win a great victory, turning the Japanese back in the mid-Pacific, and dealing them an irreparable blow by sinking or completely disabling their four carriers. Throughout the Battle of Midway, North ampton protected her carrier and with her returned undamaged to Pearl Harbor 13 June.

In mid-August, Northampton sailed for the Southwest Pacific to join in the Guadaleanal operation. She patrolled southeast of San Cristobal where on 15 September her force was attacked by submarines which damaged Wae p and North Carolina and struck O'Brien only 800 yards off North ampton'~ port beam. Now sailing with Hornet, Northampton screened the carrier during attacks on Bougainville 5 October.

During the Battle of Santa Cruz Islands, 26 October, which took place without surface contact with the enemy Northampton went to the aid of Hornet, mortally wounded by

enemy aircraft, and fired antiaircraft cover while attempting to take the stricken giant in tow. Obviously doomed, the carrier was later sunk by destroyer torpedo and gunfire, and the American force retired to the southwest.

Northampton next operated with a cruiser-destroyer force, to prevent the Japanese from reinforcing their troops on Guadalcanal The Battle of Tassafaronga began 40 minutes before midnight, 30 November, when three American destroyers made a surprise torpedo attack on the Japanese. All American ships then opened fire, which the startled enemy did not return for 7 minutes. Then two of the American cruisers took torpedo hits within the space of a minute, and 10 minutes later, another was hit, all being forced to retire from the action. Northam pton and Honolulu, with 6 destroyers continued the fieree action, scoring many hits. Close to the end of the engagement, Northampton was struck by two torpedoes, which tore a huge hole in her port side, ripping away decks and bulkheads. Flaming diesel oil sprayed over the ship, she took on water rapidly and began to list. Three hours later, as she began to sink stern first, she had to be abandoned. So orderly and controlled was the process that loss of life was surprisingly light, and the survivors were all picked up within an hour by destroyers. While three cruisers had been damaged and Northampton lost, the Japanese had been denied a major reinforcement, and once again the Navy had given vital support to the marines fighting ashore.

Northampton received 6 battle stars for World War II service.


Wreck of USS Northampton (CA-26)

USS Northampton was the lead ship of her class of Heavy Cruisers and served with the US Navy's Atlantic and Pacific Fleets before the outset of World War Two. After the opening of hostilities with Japan on December 7th, 1941 the Northampton took part in the Doolittle Raid on Japan, the Wake Island Raid and the Battle of the Santa Cruz Islands among other actions before she found herself part of Task Force 67 on patrol for Japanese resupply ships in the waters around Guadalcanal.

Under the command of Rear Admiral Carleton H. Wright, Task Force 67 was a dedicated hunter-killer group comprising four Heavy and one Light Cruiser and four Destroyers, all radar equipped, to track and attack Japanese supply ships of the 'Tokyo Express' attempting to re-supply the troops on Guadalcanal. After US codebreakers were able to decipher a message from Japanese command to troops on Guadalcanal about a resupply run taking place on the night of November 30th, the Northampton and Task Force 67 quickly made their way to Ironbottom Sound to intercept the Japanese force.

Steaming in a pre-arranged attack column with the four radar-equipped Destroyers in a Van acting as a radar picketline in the lead, followed by the Cruisers and two other Destroyers added to the Task Force enroute, the American ships arrived in Iron Bottom Sound at 21:40hrs (9:40pm) and began their patrol, expecting to surprise the onrushing Japanese. Unbeknownst to the Americans however, their movement had been spotted earlier in the day by a Japanese search plane which had informed the Japanese re-supply force consisting of eight Destroyers that there were American warships enroute to Guadalcanal to intercept them. When the USS Fletcher, steaming in the lead position of the US line, began to pick up the Japanese ships on its radar screen at 23:06hrs (11:06pm) as they rounded the Western shore of Savo Island the entire US Destroyer force prepared to open fire with their torpedoes, then clear the area for the Cruisers to begin firing. The Japanese ships also made visual contact with the US ships at roughly the same time, and expecting the attack immediately broke off their re-supply mission to engage the US ships.

At 23:20hrs (11:20pm) the US Destroyers began the Battle of Tassafaronga when they launched 20 torpedoes into the Japanese formation, then immediately fired illumination starshells and quickly moved out of the area so the Cruiser line could open fire. Aboard the USS Northampton, steaming in the rear of the US Cruiser column, the order to fire came at 23:41hrs (11:41pm) as the gun directors locked onto the closest Japanese Destroyer, the Takanami, which was quickly reduced to a mass of burning wreckage under the concentrated American fire. As the crews began scanning the seas for more targets, the Cruiser line ahead of the Northampton began to be decimated by Japanese 'Long Lance' torpedoes, launched as part of a massive Japanese salvo into the US battle line. In the space of ten minutes, three of the Cruisers ahead of Northampton were torpedoed and put out of action, two of which lost their bows. Following the USS Honolulu steaming ahead of her, the Northampton steered to Starboard (right) around the wreckage of the former US Task Force and attempted to re-establish contact with the Japanese Destroyers, which were now fleeing the area and firing parting torpedoes. Unlike the Honolulu however, the Northampton did not increase her speed to clear the area around the US ships, and at 23:48 was struck by two torpedoes in her Port (left) side one in her rear engine room, and the other further aft at the turn of her hull. A shower of flaming oil from her aft bunkers coated the rear of the ship and quickly caught fire as water poured into her engine rooms and snuffed out her boiler fires, bringing the ship to a dead stop and causing her to list to Port. Now powerless and on fire, the crew of the Northampton struggled in the darkness to try to save their ship, which was rapidly taking on water into her engine rooms, rendering her main and auxiliary engines inoperable.

By 01:30 the fires on the Stern of the Northampton had grown steadily more out of control, her list passed 20 degrees to Port and her Stern began to slip under water. Realizing that the ship was too damaged to be saved, the crew was ordered to abandon ship and were picked up by waiting Destroyers. The USS Northampton continued to burn and slowly sink before finally going down Stern-first at this location at 03:04hrs on December 1st, 1942, taking 55 members of her crew with her. For her actions in the Battle of Tassafaronga, the Northampton earned her 6th and final Battle Star.


USS Northampton CL-26 - History

USS Northampton , a 9050-ton light cruiser built at Quincy, Massachusetts, was the first of a class of six similar ships. Commissioning in May 1930, she made a shakedown cruise to the Mediterranean and thereafter took part in the United States' Fleet's regular program of operations and exercises. Reclassified as a heavy cruiser in July 1931, she received a change in hull number from CL-26 to CA-26. Northampton primarily served in the Atlantic and Caribbean areas until 1932, then was mainly in the Pacific. In mid-1941, she steamed across that ocean to visit Australia.

On 7 December 1941, Northampton was at sea with the USS Enterprise task force. The next day, she entered Pearl Harbor to witness first hand the devastation caused by Japan's suprise attack. Her early wartime operations were primarily in the Hawaiian area, but in late January 1942 she went to the central Pacific, where on 1 February she bombarded Wotje, in the Marshall Islands. A second bombardment, of Wake Island, was delivered on 24 February. Northampton was unsuccessfully attacked by Japanese aircraft at that time. In March, she operated with the carrier task force that struck Marcus Island and the next month took part in the Doolittle Raid on Japan. She accompanied USS Enterprise to the south Pacific in May 1942 and escorted her through the Battle of Midway in early June.

Northampton returned to the southern Pacific in August 1942 to participate in the Guadalcanal campaign. Serving for the next two months with carrier task forces, she was present when USS Wasp was sunk by a Japanese submarine on 15 September and accompanied USS Hornet during the 26 October Battle of the Santa Cruz Islands. When that carrier was disabled by enemy torpedoes and bombs, Northampton tried to tow her out of danger, but had to abandon Hornet to her fate after another air attack inflicted fatal damage.

During November, Northampton joined a cruiser-destroyer surface action group. On the night of 30 November 1942, her task force intercepted several Japanese destroyers off Guadalcanal. The resulting Battle of Tassafaronga was a shattering experience for the U.S. Navy, which received further proof of the enemy's superiority in night gun and torpedo combat. Northampton was one of four U.S. heavy cruisers hit by Japanese torpedoes. A serious fire amidships prevented damage control parties from controlling her flooding, and she sank stern-first three hours after she was hit.

USS Northampton 's wreck was found and examined in 1991-92. Her hull is intact and upright on the bottom of Guadalcanal's "Iron Bottom Sound", some two-thousand feet below the surface. Her guns are still trained out to port, as they were nearly fifty years earlier when she engaged Japanese destroyers in the Battle of Tassafaronga.

This page features selected views of USS Northampton (CA-26, originally CL-26).

If you want higher resolution reproductions than the digital images presented here, see: "How to Obtain Photographic Reproductions."

Click on the small photograph to prompt a larger view of the same image.

Underway during builder's trials, circa Spring 1930.

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image: 79KB 740 x 585 pixels

Underway during the early 1930s, prior to the removal of her torpedo tubes.

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image: 95KB 740 x 585 pixels

Photographed during the later 1930s, after her forward smokestack was raised.

Courtesy of Donald M. McPherson, 1969.

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image: 57KB 740 x 450 pixels

Entering the river at Brisbane, Australia, 5 August 1941.
Note her false bow wave camouflage.

Courtesy of Perry M. Allard, 1983.

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image: 86KB 740 x 585 pixels

Preparing to dock at Newcastle Wharf, Brisbane, Australia, on 5 August 1941.
Note her false bow wave camouflage.

Courtesy of James W. Fitch, 1984.

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image: 75KB 740 x 505 pixels

Refueling from USS Cimarron (AO-22), during the Doolittle Raid operation.
Photographed from USS Salt Lake City (CA-25).
The original photo caption states that this view was taken on 18 April 1942, the day the Doolittle Raid aircraft were launched to attack targets in Japan.
Note that Northampton 's forward smokestack had been reduced in height by this time.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval Historical Center.

Online Image: 68KB 740 x 605 pixels

Off Gonaives, Haiti, circa early 1939.

Courtesy of the Naval Historical Foundation, collection of Rear Admiral Paul H. Bastedo.

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image: 83KB 740 x 560 pixels

Steams into Pearl Harbor on the morning of 8 December 1941, the day after the Japanese air attack. Photographed from Ford Island, looking toward the Navy Yard, with dredging pipe in the foreground.
Northampton was at sea with Vice Admiral Halsey's task force on the day of the attack.
Note her Measure One (dark) camouflage, with a Measure Five false bow wave, and manned anti-aircraft director positions.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives.

Online Image: 98KB 740 x 605 pixels

Reproductions of this image may also be available through the National Archives photographic reproduction system.

Firing her after eight-inch guns, during the raid on Japanese-held Wotje, in the Marshall Islands, 1 February 1942.
Photographed from the ship's forward superstructure, looking aft on the starboard side, with 5"/25 guns and the after smokestack in the foreground.
USS Salt Lake City (CA-25) is astern.

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image: 116KB 740 x 630 pixels

Under attack by a Japanese seaplane, during the U.S. raid on Wake Island, 24 February 1942.
Photographed from USS Salt Lake City (CA-25), one of whose 1.1" machine gun mounts is in the foreground.
Note anti-aircraft shell bursts above Northampton and nearby bomb splash.

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image: 55KB 740 x 620 pixels

Battle of the Santa Cruz Islands, October 1942

USS Northampton (CA-26), at right, attempting to tow USS Hornet (CV-8) after she had been disabled by Japanese air attacks on 26 October 1942.


USS Northampton (CL-26, CA-26)


Figure 1: Late 1930s photograph of USS Northampton (CA-26) while at anchor. Note that all four of her scout planes are on catapults. Courtesy Robert M. Cieri. Click on photograph for larger image.


Figure 2: Late 1930s photograph of USS Northampton (CA-26) while underway. Courtesy Robert M. Cieri. Click on photograph for larger image.


Figure 3: USS Northampton (CL-26) underway during builder's trials, circa spring 1930. US Naval Historical Center Photograph. Click on photograph for larger image.


Figure 4: USS Northampton (CA-26) underway during the early 1930s, prior to the removal of her torpedo tubes. US Naval Historical Center Photograph. Click on photograph for larger image.


Figure 5: USS Northampton (CA-26) photographed during the later 1930s, after her forward smokestack was raised. Courtesy of Donald M. McPherson, 1969. US Naval Historical Center Photograph. Click on photograph for larger image.


Figure 6: This appears to be the Pedro Miguel locks, Panama Canal Zone. If so, the Northampton (CA-26) is heading south toward the Pacific, December 1934. Courtesy Robert M. Cieri. Click on photograph for larger image.


Figure 7: Starboard beam of Northampton (CA-26) while underway, 23 August 1935. Excellent detail image of the ship. Official US Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives. Click on photograph for larger image.


Figure 8: USS Northampton (CA-26) entering the river at Brisbane, Australia, 5 August 1941. Note her false bow wave camouflage. Courtesy of Perry M. Allard, 1983. US Naval Historical Center Photograph. Click on photograph for larger image.


Figure 9: USS Northampton (CA-26) preparing to dock at Newcastle Wharf, Brisbane, Australia, on 5 August 1941. Note her false bow wave camouflage. Courtesy of James W. Fitch, 1984. US Naval Historical Center Photograph. Click on photograph for larger image.


Figure 10: USS Northampton (CA-26) refueling from USS Cimarron (AO-22) during the Doolittle Raid operation. Photographed from USS Salt Lake City (CA-25). The original photo caption states that this view was taken on 18 April 1942, the day the Doolittle Raid aircraft were launched to attack targets in Japan. Note that Northampton's forward smokestack had been reduced in height by this time. Official US Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval Historical Center. Click on photograph for larger image.


Figure 11: USS Northampton (CA-26) off Gonaives, Haiti, circa early 1939. Courtesy of the Naval Historical Foundation, collection of Rear Admiral Paul H. Bastedo. US Naval Historical Center Photograph. Click on photograph for larger image.


Figure 12: USS Northampton (CA-26) steams into Pearl Harbor on the morning of 8 December 1941, the day after the Japanese air attack. Photographed from Ford Island, looking toward the Navy Yard, with dredging pipe in the foreground. Northampton was at sea with Vice Admiral Halsey's task force on the day of the attack. Note her Measure One (dark) camouflage, with a Measure Five false bow wave, and manned anti-aircraft director positions. Official US Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives. Click on photograph for larger image.


Figure 13: USS Northampton (CA-26) under attack by a Japanese seaplane during the US raid on Wake Island, 24 February 1942. Photographed from USS Salt Lake City (CA-25), one of whose 1.1-inch machine gun mounts is in the foreground. Note anti-aircraft shell bursts above Northampton and nearby bomb splash. US Naval Historical Center Photograph. Click on photograph for larger image.


Figure 14: Battle of the Santa Cruz Islands, October 1942. USS Northampton (CA-26), at right, attempting to tow USS Hornet (CV-8) after she had been disabled by Japanese air attacks on 26 October 1942. Official US Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives. Click on photograph for larger image.

Named after a city in Massachusetts, the 9,050-ton USS Northampton (CL-26) was built by the Bethlehem Steel Corporation at Quincy, Massachusetts, and was commissioned on 17 May 1930. Northampton was the lead ship of a class of six similar ships and was approximately 600 feet long and 66 feet wide. The ship had a crew of 831 officers and men and a top speed of 32 knots. Northampton was armed with nine 8-inch guns, four 5-inch guns, several 8.50-calibre machine guns, six 21-inch torpedo tubes, and four aircraft.

After being commissioned, Northampton went on a shakedown cruise in the Mediterranean and then participated in the US Navy’s regular program of operations and exercises. The ship was re-classified a heavy cruiser in July 1931 and received a change in hull number from CL-26 to CA-26. Northampton served primarily in the Atlantic and Caribbean oceans until 1932, at which point she was transferred to the Pacific Ocean and served there for the rest of her career. In 1941, Northampton steamed across the Pacific for a good-will trip to Australia.

On 7 December 1941, Northampton was at sea with the carrier USS Enterprise’s (CV-6) task force. The following day, Northampton entered Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, and saw firsthand the massive destruction caused by the Japanese the previous day. Northampton’s early wartime operations were primarily in the Hawaiian area, but in late January 1942 she steamed to the central Pacific, where on 1 February she bombarded Wotje in the Marshall Islands. The ship then bombarded Wake Island on 24 February. Northampton was attacked by Japanese aircraft during her assault on Wake Island, but the ship sustained no damage. In March 1942, Northampton was assigned to a carrier task force that struck Marcus Island and then the following month she participated in the famous Doolittle Raid on Japan. She then escorted USS Enterprise to the south Pacific in May 1942 and defended the carrier during the Battle of Midway in early June.

Northampton returned to the south Pacific in August 1942 to participate in the American amphibious assault on Guadalcanal. For the next two months she escorted carrier task forces and was present when the carrier USS Wasp (CV-7) was sunk by a Japanese submarine on 15 September and was escorting USS Hornet (CV-8) during the Battle of the Santa Cruz Islands on 26 October. When the carrier was severely damaged by Japanese torpedoes and bombs, Northampton tried to tow Hornet to safety. But Northampton had to cut the tow line with Hornet after another Japanese air attack inflicted additional damage to the carrier, eventually forcing her to sink.

In November 1942, Northampton joined a cruiser-destroyer surface action group that was assigned to prevent the Japanese from reinforcing their troops on Guadalcanal. Forty minutes before midnight, 30 November 1942, Northampton’s cruiser-destroyer surface action group ran right into a Japanese task force off Guadalcanal and the Battle of Tassafaronga began. The American destroyers started the action by firing torpedoes at the Japanese, after which all of the American warships opened fire. This stunned the Japanese task force for approximately seven minutes. But the Japanese soon recovered and fired torpedoes of their own at the American ships. Within the space of a minute, two American cruisers were hit by torpedoes and ten minutes later another cruiser was hit as well. All three of the damaged American cruisers had to leave the area, forcing the US cruisers Northampton and Honolulu, along with six destroyers, to continue the battle on their own. Shells were flying in every direction while Japanese searchlights scoured the water for American warships. Northampton was holding her own with Japanese ships until, towards the end of the battle, two torpedoes hit the cruiser, tearing a huge hole in the port side of the ship. The explosions tore away decks and bulkheads and flaming diesel oil was sprayed all over the ship. Northampton took on water rapidly and began listing sharply to port. The crew did their best to stop the flooding and put out the fires, but the damage was just too much for them. Three hours later, Northampton began to sink stern first. The crew abandoned ship and USS Northampton slipped under the waves. Fortunately, two American destroyers soon arrived on the scene and rescued the bulk of the crew from the water. The destroyers picked up 773 men, remarkable considering the damage that was done to the ship. Northampton lost 58 crewmembers during the battle, most of them when the two torpedoes hit the ship.

The Battle of Tassafaronga was a terrible defeat for the US Navy. At the start of the battle, the US Navy had five cruisers and four destroyers attacking a Japanese force of eight destroyers. The Americans should have overwhelmed the Japanese destroyers, but Japan’s better training at night fighting and their expert use of their “Long Lance” torpedoes, which were fired with deadly accuracy, made the difference. The US Navy lost one heavy cruiser sunk (Northampton) and three cruisers heavily damaged (USS Minneapolis, New Orleans, and Pensacola). The Japanese lost only one destroyer. The only good news was that the Japanese were prevented from reinforcing Guadalcanal that night. The US Navy was sustaining terrible losses to protect the Marines on that island and it would be another few months of intense fighting before the battle for Guadalcanal would end in an American victory.


USS Northhampton (CA 26)

Interesting hand-drawn cachet depicts Santa & his sled by Bernard Giffin posted aboard heavy cruiser with ship’s fancy cancel (N-18f) on 25 DEC 1934 with CHRIST/ DAY between the killers. Looks like Mr.Giffin never heard of Donner and Blitzen!

It appears mail clerk (Leo Miller, USCS #207A) made this cancel by combining dial of the ship’s Dragon cancel (N-18d) and three killer bars from a type 3 cancel. The cover appears to be the same style created by Henry Stinemetts because of the stamp was pasted upon decorated metallic paper (green & red) and usage of a Christmas label.

The first of six 9050 ton cruisers (CL/ CA 26-31) built under the limitations of the London- Washington Naval Treaties. Built by Fore River Shipyard, Quincy MA, she was named after the City of Northampton. After commissioning on May 17, 1930, she headed to Europe during the summer with the ship’s company- 90 officers and 606 enlisted. She moved to the Pacific, operating with the Scouting Force, U.S. Fleet.

NORTHAMPTON was at sea, with Admiral Halsey’s carriers during the attack on Pearl Harbor. She was sunk at the Battle of Tassafaronga on (30 NOV 1942) during the Guadalcanal Campaign and earned six battle stars for her service during the war.


American Cruisers of World War II: A Pictorial Encyclopedia by Steve Ewing - a nice softbound volume on all cruisers that saw action during the war.

Order # Ship Name Class Scale Length Beam Price
WHU-C3 USS Northampton CA-26 1/96 75" 8 1/4" $ 399.00

The 6 NORTHAMPTON class Heavy Cruisers were built to add more firepower to the US Navy's battle fleet which could not build any additional battleships due to the 1922 Washington Naval Treaty. This treaty called for a building holiday for the construction of any new battleships for 10 years and also limited the size, armaments and total tonnage allowed to build cruisers. Because of this all the cruisers built during this time were referred to as' Treaty Cruisers. The NORTHAMPTON class cruisers possessed good firepower and speed at the expense of adequate armor protection and anti torpedo defense systems. This hull comes with a detailed set of arrangement plans for the CA-28.

8" TURRET SET 3 Detailed cast turrets with 8" gun barrels and rangefinder hoods Price $179.95

CA-28 Set: This package includes the hull, plans, and turret set: also included are cast polymer and cast brass fittings. 1942 Fit : Price $ 898.00

Please note : this is not a complete kit, running gear, decks and building materials not included

Special Shipping: This hull can be shipped via FEDEX Ground Service as in OS-2 size package. Minimum Shipping and handling in the USA 48 states is $ 105.00.

For information regarding a propeller shaft set for this ship click here.

Order # Ship Name Class Scale Length Beam Price
WHU-C4 USS Indianapolis CA-35 1/96 76 1/4" 8 1/4" $ 399.00

The INDIANAPOLIS (CA-35) and PORTLAND (CA 33) were improved and enlarged versions of the previous NORTHAMPTON (CA-26) class heavy cruisers, they carried the same armament as the CA-26 class with improved armor protection and full flagship facilities. The lNDlANAPOLlS served as a Flagship for most of her career. Affer delivering the atomic bomb to Tinian Island, the ship was torpedoed and sunk by the Japanese submarine I-58 just two weeks prior to the end of the war. The PORTLAND also earned 16 battle Stars for her World War 2 service. This hull comes with a set of arrangement plans.

8" TURRET SET 3 Detailed cast turrets with 8" gun barrels and rangefinder hoods Price $179.95

CA-35 1945 Set: This package includes the hull, plans, and turret set: also included are cast polymer and cast brass fittings. Price $ 925.00

Please note : this is not a complete kit, running gear, decks and building materials not included.

Special Shipping: This hull can be shipped via FEDEX Ground Service as in OS-2 size package. Minimum Shipping and handling in the USA 48 states is $ 105.00.

For information regarding a propeller shaft set for this ship click here.

Order # Ship Name Class Scale Length Beam Price
WHU-C5 USS San Francisco CA-32 1/96 73 1/2" 7 3/4" $ 399.00

Please note that this hull is not in production yet, we will remove this notice when it is available for ordering.

The SAN FRANClSCO was a member of the NEW ORLEANS (CA-32) class Heavy Cruisers. There were 7 ships built in this class during the 1930's. Three of these ships, ASTORlA CA34, QUlNCY CA-39 AND VlNCENNES CA-44 were all lost in the Battle of Savo lsland in August of 1942. The SAN FRANClSCO was the most decorated cruiser of World War 2, earning 17 battle stars and the Presidential Unit Citation for her outstanding war service. This hull features the armor belts, anchor bolsters, porthole locations and the shaft exits and strut locations molded in and come with a set of detailed arrangement plans of the ship as she appeared late in the war.

8" TURRET SET: 3 detailed cast turrets with 9 gun barrels and range finder hoods. Price $ 179.95

CA-38 Set: This package includes the hull, plans, and turret set: also included are cast polymer and cast metal fittings. Price $ 879.00

Please note : this is not a complete kit, running gear, decks and building materials not included.

Special Shipping: This hull can be shipped via FEDEX Ground Service as in OS-2 size package. Minimum Shipping and handling in the USA 48 states is $ 110.00.

Please note : this is not a complete kit, running gear, decks and building materials not included.

C For information regarding a propeller shaft set for this ship click here.

Order # Ship Name Class Scale Length Beam Price
WHU-C6 USS Brooklyn CL-40 1/96 76 1/4" 7 3/4" $ 429.00

The BROOKLYN class light cruisers were designed and built in response to the new Japanese MOGAMl class cruisers that were coming on the world Naval scene with quite a stir in the mid 1930's. There were 7 ships of this class and 2 additional ships that were redesigned and became the ST. LOUlS class. These ships mounted 15 8'-47 cal guns in 5 triple turrets, making these the heaviest armed light cruisers built. The Brooklyn was transferred to the Chilean navy served as the O'HIGGINS until stricken in 1992 over 50 years after original commissioning. This ship was the last of her type to Survive: she was sold for scrap and sank while under tow to the scrappers in Pakistan. This hull features the armor belt, anchor bolster and the shaft exits & strut locations molded in. Plans for this ship are available from The Floating Drydock.

6" TURRET SET: 5 detailed cast turrets with 15 gun barrels and range finder hoods. Price $189.95

CL-40 1942 Set: This package includes the hull, plans, and turret set: also included are cast polymer and cast brass fittings. Price $ 942.00

CL-45 1942 Set: This package includes the hull, plans, and turret set: also included are cast polymer and cast brass fittings. Price $ 919.00

Please note : this is not a complete kit, running gear, decks and building materials not included.

Special Shipping: This hull can be shipped via FEDEX Ground Service as in OS-2 size package. Minimum Shipping and handling in the USA 48 states is $ 110.00.

Please note : this is not a complete kit, running gear, decks and building materials not included.

For information regarding a propeller shaft set for this ship click here.

Order # Ship Name Class Scale Length Beam Price
WHU-C7 USS Wichita CA-45 1/96 76 1/4" 7 3/4" $ 419.00

USS WlCHlTA (CA45) was a one of kind heavy cruiser. Originally intended to be the 8th unit of the CA-32 class, the ship was built instead to a similar design as the BROOKLYN (CL40) class light cruisers but with improved armor protection. The WlCHlTA served in the Atlantic during the early months of the war then was present at the North African invasion before reporting to the Pacific to replace cruiser losses in the Solomon's actions. The Witch saw action in most of the battles in the Pacific for the duration of the war .This hull features molded in armor belts, anchor bolsters and the shaft exits and strut locations molded in.

8" fiberglass turrets with 9 cast gun barrels and range finder hoods, 4 5" single enclosed mounts, 2 Mk 34 directors. Price $ 259.90

Set with Polymer and Cast Brass fittings $ 1015.00

Please note : this is not a complete kit, running gear, decks and building materials not included.

Special Shipping: This hull can be shipped via FEDEX Ground Service as in OS-2 size package. Minimum Shipping and handling in the USA 48 states is $ 98.00.

Please note : this is not a complete kit, running gear, decks and building materials not included.

For information regarding a propeller shaft set for this ship click here.

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Order # Ship Name Class Scale Length Beam Price
WHU-C8 USS Helena CL-50 1/96 76 1/4" 7 3/4" $ 419.00

The HELENA (CL -5O) and her only sister ship, the ST, LOUlS (CL49). were improved half-sisters of the previous BROOKLYN (CL-40) class light cruisers. These ships had improved armor protection and a greatly improved secondary battery of the new 5"38 cal dual purpose guns in twin mounts, instead of the older 5" single open mounts of all the previous US Navy cruiser classes. The Helena was lost to 3 torpedoes that hit almost simultaneously, broke her back and blew off her bow. This hull has the armor belts, anchor bolsters, shaft exits and strut locations molded in and comes with a plans set

6" TURRET SET: 6 6" 47 triple turrets with 15 cast gun barrels and range finder hoods, 2 Mk 34 directors. Price $ 239.95

5" GUN SET: 4 5" twin gun mounts with gun barrels and base rings (single purpose type for CL 49 and 50 only) Price $ 72.95

CL-50 SET : This package includes the hull, plans, and turret set: also included are cast polymer and cast brass fittings. Price $ 1049.00

Please note : this is not a complete kit, running gear, decks and building materials not included.

Special Shipping: This hull can be shipped via FEDEX Ground Service as in OS-2 size package. Minimum Shipping and handling in the USA 48 states is $ 98.00.

For information regarding a propeller shaft set for this ship click here.

Order # Ship Name Class Scale Length Beam Price
WHU-C9 USS Atlanta CL-51 1/96 67 5/8" 6 1/2" $ 429.00

The ATLANTA class Anti Aircraft Light Cruiser CL(AA) 5l.were the first US Navy ships to be built as anti-aircraft escorts and were designed along the lines of the British DlDO class cruisers. These ships had several firsts with the US Navy, such as, knuckled bow, enlarged destroyer type machinery in a cruiser sized hull, and the first USN cruiser to mount 5" guns as the main armament. The 4 Atlanta class cruisers served well through the Pacific war and earned many battle stars even though both the ATLANTA (CL -51) and the JUNEAU (CL-52) were both lost in November 1942 off Guadalcanal in one of the many engagements fought there This hull features the bow bulwark, anchor bolster, armor belts ,shaft exits and strut locations molded in. Drawings and photos for this ship are available from: The Floating Drydock.

5" GUN SET: 8 5" /38 caliber twin gun mounts with gun barrels, sight hoods, and bases 2 Mk 37 directors (angle back type). Price $ 259.95

CL-51 Set (1942) Set $ 995.00 - can be used for CL-51 through 54

CL 53 SET (1945)(Can be used for CL-53 though CL-54) This package includes the hull, plans, and turret set: also included are cast polymer and cast brass fittings. Price $ 877.00

Please note : this is not a complete kit, running gear, decks and building materials not included.

Special Shipping : This hull can be shipped via FEDEX Ground Service as in OS-1 size package. Shipping and handling in the USA 48 states is $ 80.00.


USS San Diego by Dave Manley

For information regarding a propeller shaft set for this ship click here.

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Order # Ship Name Class Scale Length Beam Price
WHU-C 10 USS Cleveland CL-55 1/96 76 1/4" 8 5/16" $ 429.00

There were 27 CLEVELAND class Light Cruisers completed during World War 2. These ships were designed and built to counter the numerous Japanese cruisers and destroyers that were expected to be encountered in the South and Western Pacific if war did break out between the US and Japan. During the war that did break out, these ships fought in almost every naval battle form late 1942 until the end of the war. Although some of these ships sustained severe damage during these engagements, none were lost as a result. Our CL-55 hull features molded in armor belts, hull knuckles, anchor bolsters shaft exits and strut locations. Also included is a set of arrangement plans for the CL-92.

CL 55 TURRET SET: 4 cast triple 6" turrets, 12 gun barrels and range finder hoods, 6 5" /38 caliber twin gun mounts with gun barrels, sight hoods, and bases 2 Mk 37 directors (angle back type), 2 Mk 34 directors with Mk 8 radar units. Price $ 399.95

CL 55 SET (For CL 82, 1944 - 45) This package includes the hull, plans, and turret set: also included are cast polymer and cast brass fittings. Price $ 1182.00

Please note : this is not a complete kit, running gear, decks and building materials not included.

Special Shipping: This hull can be shipped via FEDEX Ground Service as in OS-2 size package. Minimum Shipping and handling in the USA 48 states is $ 110.00.

For information regarding a propeller shaft set for this ship click here.

Order # Ship Name Class Scale Length Beam Price
WHU-C 11 USS Baltimore CA-68 1/96 84 1/96 9 1/96 $ 449.00

The BALTlMORE class Heavy Cruisers were possibly the best ships of their type to see service in World War 2 . These ships were well armed with a main armament of 9 8" guns in triple turrets and a secondary battery of 12 5" dual purpose guns in twin mounts as well as numerous 40 mm and 20 mm anti-aircraft guns. With a top speed of 33 knots and endurance of over 10,000 miles. these were truly versatile ships that served from 1943 to 1971. This hull features molded in bow bulwark, anchor bolsters. armor belts and the shaft exits & strut locations. This hull is for the CA-68 to CA 71 only. Plans for this ship are available from The Floating Drydock

CA-68 1945 SET This package includes the hull, plans, and turret set: also included are cast polymer and cast brass fittings. Price $ 1274.00

Please note : this is not a complete kit, running gear, decks and building materials not included.

Special Shipping: This hull can be shipped via FEDEX Ground Service as in OS-2 size package. Minimum Shipping and handling in the USA 48 states is $ 135.00.

For information regarding a propeller shaft set for this ship click here.

Order # Ship Name Class Scale Length Beam Price
WHU-C 11A USS Boston CAG-1 1/96 84 1/96 9 1/96 $ 449.00

This hull represents the square stern BALTIMORE class cruisers that were converted into Guided Missile Heavy Cruisers. These 2 ships were converted into what they called single end missile cruisers, Most of the superstructure from where the forward stack stood, was removed and a new structure built to accommodate the terrier missile launchers and directors. This conversion also included trunking the uptakes into a single large stack new mast and radars were also installed at this time. This hull does not come with plans, Plans are available from the Floating Drydock.

8" TURRET SET: 2 cast turrets, 6 cast 8" gun barrels and range finder hoods, 5 5" twin mounts ith base rings and brass gun barrels 1 MK-34 directors with MK-13 radar and 1 MK-37 director. $279.95

CAG-1 SET This package includes the hull, plans, and turret set. Also included are cast polymer and cast brass fittings, as listed in our catalog. Please note this is not a complete kit, running gear, decks, structures and building materials not included. $1206.00

Special Shipping : This hull can be shipped via FEDEX Ground Service as in OS-2 size package. Shipping and handling in the USA 48 states is $ 135.00.

For information regarding a propeller shaft set for this ship click here.

Order # Ship Name Class Scale Length Beam Price
WHU-C 12 USS Pittsburg CA-72 1/96 84 1/96 9 1/96 $ 449.00

The PITTSBURGH'S were generally referred to as BALTlMORE class Heavy Cruisers. These ships were almost identical to the previous CA-68 class series except for the entirely redesigned stern section of the hull with only 1 aircraft crane on the fantail instead of 2 and several other changes to the superstructure to improve visibility and anti-aircraft capabilities. This hull features molded in bow bulwarks, anchor bolsters, armor belts, shaft exits and strut locations.

This hull can be used to model the CA-72 to CA-75. CA-122, 123, 135 and CA-136 only.

8" TURRET SET: 3 fiberglass turrets, 9 cast 8" gun barrels and range finder hoods, 2 Mk 34 directors with Mk 8 radars. Price $219.95

5" TURRET SET: 6 5" /38 cal twin gun mounts with 12 gun barrels, cast sight hoods and bases, plus 2 Mk 37 directors. Price $169.95

CA 72 1945 set: This package includes the hull, plans, and 8" and 5" turret set. Also included are cast polymer and cast brass fittings. $1283.00

CG-11 Set $ 982.00 Plans availabe at the Floating Drydock.

Contact us for detail for the above sets.

Special Shipping: This hull can be shipped via FEDEX Ground Service as in OS-2 size package. Minimum Shipping and handling in the USA 48 states is $ 135.00.

Please note : this is not a complete kit, running gear, decks and building materials not included.

For information regarding a propeller shaft set for this ship click here.

Order # Ship Name Class Scale Length Beam Price
WHU-C13 USS Oakland CL-95 1/96 67 5/8" 6 1/2" $ 359.00

OAKLAND'S were improved ATLANTA (CL-51) class light cruisers. Due to war experiences the bridge structure was redesigned to improve visibility for the crew and sky spotters during anti-aircraft actions, and the 2 waist mounted 5" guns were eliminated in order to make space and weight available for more medium and light AA guns. This hull has the bow bulwark, anchor bolsters, armor belts and the shaft exits & strut locations molded in. Drawings and photos of this Ship can be ordered from the Floating Drydock.

5" GUN SET: 65" /38 caliber twin gun mounts with gun barrels, sight hoods, and bases 2 Mk 37 directors (angle back type). Price $ 219.95

CL 95 SET (Can be used for CL-95 though CL-98) This package includes the hull, plans, and turret set: also included are cast polymer and cast brass fittings. Price $ 856.00

Please note : this is not a complete kit, running gear, decks and building materials not included.

Special Shipping : This hull can be shipped via FEDEX Ground Service as in OS-1size package. Shipping and handling in the USA 48 states is $ 80.00.

For information regarding a propeller shaft set for this ship click here.

Order # Ship Name Class Scale Length Beam Price
WHU-C13A USS JUNEAU CL-119 1/96 67 5/8" 6 1/2" $ 369.00

The USS Juneau CL-119 class cruisers were the 3rd group of USS ATLANTA (CL-51) class light cruisers. Due to war experiences with the Atlanta and Oakland groups the bridge structure was redesigned to improve overhead visibility and firing arc's for the light AA. The super firing 5" twin mounts were all lowered to improve stability and reduce weight. The Juneau served into July 1956 and was the last of the World War 2 CL's in service. This hull has the bow bulwark, anchor bolsters, armor belts and the shaft exits & strut locations molded in. Drawings and photos of this Ship can be ordered from the Floating Drydock.

5" GUN SET: 65" /38 caliber twin gun mounts with gun barrels, sight hoods, and bases 2 Mk 37 directors (angle back type). Price $ 219.95

CL 95 SET (Can be used for CL-95 though CL-98) This package includes the hull, plans, and turret set: also included are cast polymer and cast brass fittings. Price $ 852.00

Please note : this is not a complete kit, running gear, decks and building materials not included.

Special Shipping : This hull can be shipped via FEDEX Ground Service as in OS-1size package. Shipping and handling in the USA 48 states is $ 80.00.

For information regarding a propeller shaft set for this ship click here.

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Order # Ship Name Class Scale Length Beam Price
WHU-C 14 USS Oaklahoma City CLG-5 1/96 76 1/4" 8 5/16" $ 429.00

This hull represents the 6 CLEVELAND class light cruisers that were converted ta single end guided missile light cruisers (CLG-3 class) in the late 1950's and early 60's to provide Terrier and Talos missile launching platforms in the US Navy until larger and newer guided missile destroyers and cruisers could be designed and built to provide for fleet anti-aircraft missile defense. The OKLAHOMA ClTY served as seventh fleet flagship during most of her career in the Far East. This hull features molded in anchor bolsters, armor belts shaft exits and strut locations to aid the modeler with building their ship A set of arrangement plans for the CLG-4 accompanies this hull.

6" GUN SET: 1 6" triple turret kit, 1 5" /38 gun mount kit, 1 Mk 37 director and 1 Mk 34 director with Mk 13 radar. . Price $ 89.95

CLG-5 SET This package includes the hull, plans, and turret set: also included are cast polymer and cast brass fittings. Price $ 835.00

Please note : this is not a complete kit, running gear, decks and building materials not included.

Special Shipping: This hull can be shipped via FEDEX Ground Service as in OS-2 size package. Minimum Shipping and handling in the USA 48 states is $ 110.00.

For information regarding a propeller shaft set for this ship click here.

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Order # Ship Name Class Scale Length Beam Price
WHU-C 15 USS Long Beach CLGN-9 CGN 9 1/96 90" 9 3/16" $ 489.00

The LONG BEACH was the largest Nuclear powered cruiser in the US Navy and just completed over 3 decades of service This ship had many firsts to her credit including: first nuclear powered surface warship to be built, first cruiser to have only missiles as main armament and she was the first cruiser to be designed and built by the US Navy after the large cruiser building programs of World War Two were halted in the late 1940's. Our USS LONG BEACH hull features molded in anchor bolsters, bilge keels shaft exits ,main cooling water intake, and the keel mounted sonar dome. A detailed set of plans also accompanies this hull.


USS Long Beach by Loren Perry

CGN-9 SET This package includes the hull, plans, and available weapon systems: also included are cast polymer and cast brass fittings:

Please note : this is not a complete kit, running gear, decks and building materials not included.

Special Shipping : This hull can be shipped via FEDEX Ground Service as in OS-3 size package. Shipping and handling in the USA 48 states is $ 185.00.

For information regarding a propeller shaft set for this ship click here.

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Order # Ship Name Class Scale Length Beam Price
WHU-C 16 USS Leahy CG-16 1/96 65 5/8" 6 7/8" $ 389.00

The 9 LEAHY class Guided Missile Cruisers were designed and built to provide long range anti-aircraft and anti missile protection for the US Navy's carrier battle groups. Originally these ships were designated as guided missile destroyer leaders (DLG-16) class, this was changed to CG in 1975. These ships were all removed from service in 1992 to 1994. Our LEAHY hull features the bow mounted sonar dome, anchor bolsters shaft exits and strut locations molded in and comes with a set of drawings of the CG-21 as she appeared when new in 1967.

CG-16 SET This package includes the hull, plans, and available weapon systems: also included are cast polymer and cast brass fittings appropriate circa 1988. Price $ 1129.00

DLG-16 SET This package includes the hull, plans, and available weapon systems: also included are cast polymer and cast metal fittings appropriate circa 1967-71. Price $ 678.00

Please note : this is not a complete kit, running gear, decks and building materials not included.

Special Shipping : This hull can be shipped via FEDEX Ground Service as in OS-1size package. Shipping and handling in the USA 48 states is $ 85.00.

For information regarding a propeller shaft set for this ship click here.

Order # Ship Name Class Scale Length Beam Price
WHU-C 17 USS Belknap / USS Fox CG-33 CG-26 1/96 68 3/4" 7 3/4" $ 399.00

The 9 ships of the BELKNAP class were built along similar lines as the previous CG-16 class Guided Missile Cruisers except that these ships have a 5'-54 cal, MK42 single semi-auto gun mount aft in place of the second MK- 11 twin arm missile launcher. Another improvement to this class was the addition of helicopter facilities and a larger more capable sonar system. This hull has the large bow mounted sonar dome, anchor bolsters shaft exits and strut locations molded in.

This hull now comes with a set of for the USS Fox CG-33 as she in the mid 1980's

CG-26 SET This package includes the hull, plans, and available weapon systems: also included are cast polymer and cast brass fittings . Price $ 796.00

Please note : this is not a complete kit, running gear, decks and building materials not included.

Special Shipping : This hull can be shipped via FEDEX Ground Service as in OS-1 size package. Shipping and handling in the USA 48 states is $ 88.00.

For information regarding a propeller shaft set for this ship click here.

Order # Ship Name Class Scale Length Beam Price
WHU-C 18 USS Ticonderoga CG-47 1/96 70 7/8" 7 1/4" $ 419.00

The TlCONDEROGA class Guided Missile Cruisers were designed and built to carry the Aegis radar I tracking system for area anti aircraft and anti-missile defensive system for the US Navy's Carrier Battle Groups (CVBG). This system is built around the SPY-1 Phased Array radar, which can track, identify and illuminate multiple targets simultaneously over a large area. The CG-47 class cruisers are built on an improved SPRUANCE class destroyer hull. The first 5 ships this class have the MK-26 twin arm missile launchers mounted fore and aft, while all follow on ships from CG-52 have the newer MK41 vertical launching system installed. These ships have had many design changes between the first ships of the class to the final ones. Our CG-47 hull features the bow bulwark, shaft exits & strut locations and the large bow mounted sonar dome molded in and comes with a set af drawings for the CG-47 as built.

CG-47 SET This package includes the hull with plans, MK-26 missile launchers, S' guns, Harpoon launchers, ClWS I ,SPY-1 faces SLQ-32, WSC3 radomes and IFF antenna, SRBOC's and MK-99 illuminators. Doors, hatches, mooring bitts & chocks, fire hose racks & reels, life rafts, sliding padeyes, vents, side lights and many other parts listed in the fittings section comes with this set. You can contact us if you have further questions about this, or any of our hull packages.

CG-58 (VLS) SET $ 878.00 (Comes with plans for VLS Ship)

Please note : this is not a complete kit, running gear, decks and building materials not included.

Special Shipping : This hull can be shipped via FEDEX Ground Service as in OS-1 size package. Shipping and handling in the USA 48 states is $ 98.00.

Please note : this is not a complete kit, running gear, decks and building materials not included.

For information regarding a propeller shaft set for this ship click here.

Order # Ship Name Class Scale Length Beam Price
WHU-C 19 KM Prinz Eugen Hipper 1:100 83" 8 5/8" $ 498.00

The PRINZ EUGEN was an improved ADMIRAL HIPPER class heavy cruiser, and was the last of her type to be completed by the German Navy. With her raked Atlantic Bow and long profile she was considered one of the best looking cruisers of all time. Her profile was very similar to the BISMARCK, resulting in the Battlecruiser HOOD firing on her, instead of the battleship during the fateful battle of the Denmark Strait. The PRINZ EUGEN continued to serve throughout the war, and was turned over to the US Navy in late 1945, eventually being expended in an Atomic bomb test.

8" TURRET SET: 4 cast turrets with range finder hoods, periscopes, rear vents, 8 8" barrels and 4 barbettes. $ 229.00

DIRECTORS: 4 Anit aircraft directors, ball type, 2 main battery directors ( main top, and aft) $ 79.95

PRINZ EUGEN SET - Email for details $ 1155.00

Special Shipping: This hull can be shipped via FEDEX Ground Service as in OS-2 size package. Minimum Shipping and handling in the USA 48 states is $ 135.00.

Heavy Cruisers of the Admiral Hipper Class: The Admiral Hipper, Blucher, Prince Eugen, Seydlitz and Lutzow by Gerhard Koop, Klaus-Peter Schmolke

Order # Ship Name Class Scale Length Beam Price
WHU-C 20 KM Graf Spee Deutschland 1:100 73 1/4" 8 7/16" $ 419.00

The GRAF SPEE was the last of 3 "Panzerschiffe" (Armored Ship) built by the German navy during the early l930's. These ships were most commonly referred to as "Pocket Battleships" in the naval publications and the news media of the time. After the GRAF SPEE had been lost the 2 remaining ships were reclassified as Heavy Cruisers. When these ships were first completed they caused quite a stir in the naval community, with their 11" turrets mounted on such a small displacement and diesel engines that could propel them to 28 knots. The idea of German naval planners was that they could "out-run anything they could not out-shoot". The GRAF SPEE was the first large ship loss of the German navy in World War 2, when she was scuttled off Uruguay in December of 1939. This hull features molded in anchor recesses, armor belts, porthole locations, shaft exit housings and strut locations. A detailed set of plans is included.

STRUCTURE: Fiberglass fighting tower structure and stack with cast polymer stack cap $ 79.95

11" TURRETS: 2 fiberglass 11" turret houses, 6 cast gun barrels, periscopes, sight covers, range finder hoods and rear vents. Price: $ 79.95

GRAF SPEE SET - email for details $ 992.00

Special Shipping: This hull can be shipped via FEDEX Ground Service as in OS-1 size package. Minimum Shipping and handling in the USA 48 states is $ 115.00.

Order # Ship Name Class Scale Length Beam Price
WHU-C 21 USS Salem CA-139 1/96 89 5/6" 9 5/8" $ 499.00

Please note that this hull is not in production yet, we will remove this notice when it is available for ordering.

The DES MOINES CA-134 class cruisers were height of US Heavy Cruiser design, they were the largest and best armored of all heavy cruisers built by any navy. These ships were designed and had their construction commence during WW II but were completed towards the end of the 1940's, surpassingly non of these ships saw action during the Korean war, they were instead deployed to the eastern Atlantic and Mediterranean. The only ship of this class to see any action was the USS Newport News CA-148, this ship acted as 7th Fleet Flagship during several tours of duty off Viet Nam until she was decommissioned in June of 1975 which gave her a career that spanned over 26 years, Newport News was scrapped in the mid 90's. The other 2 sisters were decommissioned in 1959 and 1961 and retained in the naval vessel register until 1993. The Salem is now a museum ship in Quincy Mass. Where she was built. The Des Moines was scrapped in Texas in 2009 after nearly 5 decades in mothballs.. This hull has the armor belts, anchor bolsters, shaft exits & strut locations molded in. A set of arrangement plans is also included with this hull.

Special Shipping: This hull can be shipped via FEDEX Ground Service as in OS-1 size package. Minimum Shipping and handling in the USA 48 states is $ 170.00.


USS Northampton CL-26 - History

From: Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships , Vol. V, p. 111-12.

(CL-26: dp. 9,050 l. 600' 3" b. 66' 1" dr. 16' 4" s. 32.5 k. cpl. 621 a. 9 8", 4 5", 8 .50 cal. mg., 6 21" tt. cl. Northampton )

Northampton (CL-26) was laid down 12 April 1928 by Bethlehem Steel Corp., Quincy, Mass., launched 5 September 1929, sponsored by Mrs. Calvin Coolidge and commissioned 17 May 1930, Captain Walter N. Vernou in command.

Joining the Atlantic Fleet, Northampton made a shakedown cruise to the Mediterranean during the summer of 1930, then participated in the fleet training schedule which took her to the Caribbean, the Canal Zone, and, occasionally, into the Pacific fo r exercises with other cruisers and ships of all types. Redesignated CA-26 in 1931, she operated primarily in the Pacific from 1932, homeported at San Pedro, and later at Pearl Harbor.

Northampton was at sea with Admiral William Halsey in Enterprise during the Japanese attack 7 December 1941, returning to Pearl Harbor the next day. On the 9th the force sortied to search northeast of Oahu, then swept south to Johnston Islan d, then north again to hunt the enemy west of Lisianski and Midway. Through January 1942 Northampton joined in such searches until detached with Salt Lake City to bombard Wotje 1 February. The bombardment not only demolished bu ildings and fuel dumps on the island, but also sank two Japanese ships. A similar assault was fired against Wake 24 February when despite serious enemy counterfire, the guns of Northampton and her force started large fires on the island and sank a dredge in the lagoon. As Northampton retired from the island, enemy sea-planes, landbased planes, and patrol craft attacked, but all were destroyed or repulsed.

On 4 March, the force launched aircraft for a strike on Marcus, then turned east for Pearl Harbor. Early in April the Enterprise force, Northampton a member, sortied once again, and joined the Hornet force for the "Shangri-La" raid on Tokyo 18 April. Once again the ships replenished at Pearl Harbor, then sailed for the Southwest Pacific, arriving just after the Battle of the Coral Sea. Returning to Pearl Harbor, Northampton prepared for the action soon to come at Midway, when s he screened Enterprise. On 4 and 5 June the American carriers launched their planes to win a great victory, turning the Japanese back in the mid-Pacific, and dealing them an irreparable blow by sinking or completely disabling their four carriers. T hroughout the Battle of Midway, Northampton protected her carrier and with her returned undamaged to Pearl Harbor 13 June.

In mid-August, Northampton sailed for the Southwest Pacific to join in the Guadalcanal operation. She patrolled southeast of San Cristobal where on 15 September her force was attacked by submarines which damaged Wasp and North Caro lina and struck O'Brien only 800 yards off North Hampton's port beam. Now sailing with Hornet, Northampton screened the carrier during attacks on Bougainville 5 October.

During the Battle of Santa Cruz Islands, 26 October, which took place without surface contact with the enemy, Northampton went to the aid of Hornet, mortally wounded by

enemy aircraft, and fired antiaircraft cover while attempting to take the stricken giant in tow. Obviously doomed, the carrier was later sunk by destroyer torpedo and gunfire, and the American force retired to the southwest.

Northampton next operated with a cruiser-destroyer force to prevent the Japanese from reinforcing their troops on Guadalcanal. The Battle of Tassafaronga began 40 minutes before midnight, 30 November, when three American destroyers made a surprise torpedo attack on the Japanese. All American ships then opened fire, which the startled enemy did not return for 7 minutes. Then two of the American cruisers took torpedo hits within the space of a minute, and 10 minutes later, another was hit, all being forced to retire from the action. Northampton and Honolulu, with 6 destroyers, continued the fierce action, scoring many hits. Close to the end of the engagement, Northampton was struck by two torpedoes, which tore a huge hole in her port side, ripping away decks and bulkheads. Flaming diesel oil sprayed over the ship, she took on water rapidly and began to list. Three hours later, as she began to sink stern first, she had to be abandoned. So orderly and controlled was the process tha t loss of life was surprisingly light, and the survivors were all picked up within an hour by destroyers. While three cruisers had been damaged and Northampton lost, the Japanese had been denied a major reinforcement, and once again the Navy had gi ven vital support to the marines fighting ashore.


US Navy Cruisers

USS Philadelphia (CL-41). In the 1950s, she was commisioned into the Brazilian Navy as Almirante Barroso.

USS Brooklyn (CA-40) was the lead ship of her class of seven light cruisers.

USS Quincy (CA-39). She was the first ship sunk in the area that would later be known as Ironbottom Sound.

USS San Francisco (CA-38) near Korea in 1945. She saw extensive action during the Guadalcanal campaign, during which she was heavily damaged and her captain and admiral killed. She was the third most decorated ship in the US Navy, earning 17 battle stars.

USS Tuscaloosa (CA-37). She earned 7 battle stars for her service in World War II. Never damaged in battle, she led a charmed life compared to her six sister ships, three of which were sunk and the other three heavily damaged.

USS Houston (CL/CA-30) off San Diego, California, with President Franklin D. Roosevelt on board. She was sunk in the Battle of Sunda Strait in March 1942.

USS Astoria (CA-34) was the lead ship of the Astoria-class of heavy cruisers (later renamed the New Orleans-class). She was sunk at the Battle of Savo Island in August 1942.

USS Portland (CA-33) was the lead ship of her class of cruisers. She saw extensive service in World War II, participating in the Battle of Coral Sea, Battle of Midway and the Naval Battle of Guadalcanal. She conducted shore bombardments in support of the landings at the Aleutian Islands, Gilbert and Marshall Islands, Mariana Islands, New Guinea, Lingayen Gulf and Corregidor Island, and the Battle of Okinawa.


Northampton Class Heavy Cruisers

The Northampton class heavy cruisers were improved versions of the earlier Pensacola Class, with reduced armament, a hanger for their aircraft, improved sub-division of the boiler rooms and a forecastle to give them superior sea keeping abilities.

The two Pensacola class cruisers were the first American heavy cruisers constructed after the First World War. They were armed with ten 8in guns in four turrets, and carried four aircraft, all of which were stored on deck. They were limited a displacement of 10,000t by the Washington Naval Treaty of 1921 but were lightly armoured and were significantly under weight.

Work on the Northampton class began before either of the Pensacola class ships had been laid down. On 24 February 1926 the General Board asked about the possibility of reducing the number of guns carried and using the weight that was saved to add bulkheads to split up the two large boiler rooms used on the earlier design, add a forecastle to improve see keeping and improve the aircraft facilities - the Pensacola ships carried four aircraft but they had to be stored on the deck.

By April 1926 two alternative gun layouts had been studied - one with four twin turrets and one with three tipple turrets, two at the front and one at the rear of the ship. The nine gun design was found to be superior - the extra turret on the eight gun ship took up space and added weight

The secondary armament was provided by four 5in guns in single mountings. Four more 5in guns, to be carried on the hanger roof, were approved in February 1935 but not installed until 1938-39.

Initial anti-aircraft armament was poor. Eight .5in Browning machine guns with high angle directors were installed in 1933. In 1940 the US Navy decided to install four quad 1.1in gun mountings on its cruisers in response to the threat posed by airpower in the first year of the Second World War. The Northampton class ships were given four 3in guns while they waited for the 1.1in quads. As the war progressed 20mm guns were installed wherever there was space, while the 1.1in guns were replaced with 40mm Oerlikon guns on those ships that survived for long enough. By the end of the war the surviving ships all had powerful but varied anti-aircraft batteries.

Six torpedo tubes were installed when the ships were built, but they were later removed.

The improved aircraft accommodation consisted of blast proof hangers that were installed around the after funnel. These could carry four aircraft. Another two could be stowed on the two catapults, which were mounted on towers in the amidships area. The towers compensated for the increased size of the superstructure on these ships.

The Northampton class had similar armour to their predecessors. There was 3in plate on the side, 13ft deep with 5ft below the waterline. The magazines had 3 3/4in armour on their sides. The armoured deck was 1in thick over the machinery and 2in over the magazine. The gun turrets had 2.5in of front armour, 2in on the roof and .75in to the sides and rear. A total of 1,057 tons of armour was carried. Some thought was given to increasing the armour protection when it became clear that the ships would be under-weight, but the weight was used elsewhere.

Six ships were authorised under the FY29 budget. Three of them were equipped as Divisional Flagships and three as Fleet Flagships (with extra accommodation between the forward superstructure and the catapult towers.

Most of the Northampton class ships served in the Pacific during the Second World War, and three were lost in action (USS Northampton, USS Chicago and USS Houston). The only exception was the Augusta, which served in the Mediterranean, with the British Home Fleet and took part in the Normandy landings.

Originally the US Navy had planned to build five more ships of the Northampton class as part of the 1929 programme, to be funded under Fiscal Year 29. When it became clear just how under-weight the Northamptons actually were these plans were abandoned. CA-33 and CA-35 were completed as the Portland class, while the other three became the first ships of the New Orleans class. Both carried more armour, with the biggest improvement on the New Orleans class.


USS Chicago (CA-29)

Authored By: Staff Writer | Last Edited: 05/02/2019 | Content ©www.MilitaryFactory.com | The following text is exclusive to this site.

The Northampton-class cruisers were born as a six-strong group during the decade following the close of World War 1 (1914-1918). It superseded the outgoing Pensacola-class which were limited in their design (10,000 tons maximum) by the Washington Naval Treaty of the early 1920s. While USS Northampton (CA-26) became the lead ship of the emerging group, USS Chicago (CA-29) was one of her notable sisters. She originally carried the pennant number of "CL-29" prior to reclassification in 1931 to CA-29 to conform with the requirements of the London Naval Treaty.

USS Chicago was ordered on December 18th, 1924 and saw her keel laid down by Mare Island Naval Shipyard of California on September 10th, 1928. She was officially launched on April 10th, 1930 given the namesake of the city of Chicago, Illinois - the second United States warship to hold the name.

The warship showcased a running length of 600 feet, a beam of 66 feet and a draught of over 16 feet. Power was through a boiler-steam turbine arrangement encompassing 8 x White-Forster boilers feeding 4 x Parsons reduction steam turbines driving 4 x shafts under stern. Maximum speed in ideal conditions could reach over 32.5 knots and range was out to 12,000 miles. A typical crew complement was 691 personnel led by 90 officers. Armor protection measured up to 3.75 inches at the belt, 2.5 inches at the primary turrets and 1.25 inches along the conning tower.

Armament, the heart of any warship of the period, was led by a primary battery of 9 x 8" guns held in three triple-gunned turrets arranged as two forward and one rear emplacement. Only during broadsides could the full power of this armament be brought to bear. Anti-Aircraft (AA) support was through 4 x 5" guns and there were also 2 x 3-pounder cannons carried for saluting purposes. The vessel was equipped with six total torpedo tubes of 21" diameter.

USS Chicago carried as many as four Curtiss SOC Seagull floatplane biplanes for reconnaissance, scouting and artillery direction purposes. These were launched via a pair of catapults featured at midships and recovered by way of onboard crane.

She set sail from Mare Island in July of 1931and participated in Fleet Problem XIII in 1942, remaining in Pacific waters for the foreseeable future. A 1933 collision in full fog with a British cargo vessel (SS Silver Palm) cost the lives of three crew. 1934 saw USS Chicago in Caribbean waters for group exercises after which she made her way to New York for review. Traversing through the Panama Canal, USS Chicago then made port at San Pedro, California where, in 1940, she received RCA CXAM radar. After September the ship was reassigned to Pearl Harbor, Hawaii.

Fortunately for the vessel and crew, USS Chicago was away with Task Force 12 (TF12) during the Japanese surprise attack on the Harbor on December 7th, 1941 - marking America's formal entry into World War 2. She was immediately placed into combat readiness and took on several patrols meant to locate and engage the departing enemy fleet though these actions proved fruitless. In February she joined ANZAC at Suva Bay and was part of the force providing cover fire at New Guinea and New Caledonia. Her guns were also brought to bear against enemy positions at Tulagi of the Solomon Islands campaign (Battle of Coral Sea) and was strafed by Japanese warplanes in May. That same month a Japanese "midget submarine" attempted a night-time attack on Chicago as she lay in Sydney Harbor, Australia. Two torpedoes were fired at her - one missed while the other failed to explode.

USS Chicago formed part of the force covering the Allied landings at Guadalcanal in August and took part in the Battle of Savo Island soon after. She took a torpedo hit during the fracas but recorded little damage. Light repairs were enacted at Noumea until more in-depth work was undertaken at San Francisco. Before the end of 1942, Chicago had her armament suite updated to include 16 x 28mm AA guns and 28 x 20mm Oerlikon AA guns to help improve her ability to repel incoming aerial attacks. Of note is that she lost her torpedo tubes.

With the required work completed, USS Chicago sailed from San Francisco in January 1943 and her subsequent voyage took her to Noumea before heading to Guadalcanal as a convoy escort. The group fell under attack from above and below and Chicago took two torpedoes into her side which caused power to be disrupted and flooding to occur. The listing vessel was controlled by a timely crew response which saved her from a worse fate. She was, again, struck by four more Japanese torpedoes which proved to be her death knell for the crippled ship sank on January 30th, 1943 during what came to be known as the "Battle of Rennell Island".