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Schofield DEG-3 - History

Schofield DEG-3 - History


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Schofield
(DEG-3: dp. 3,426 (f.); 1. 414'6", b. 44'1", dr. 24', s.
27 k.; cpl. 248; a. 1 5", Tar., ASROC, 2 ASW tt.;
cl. Brooke)

Schofield (DEG-3) was laid down on 15 April 1963 by the Lockheed Shipbuilding and Construction Co. Seattle, Wash.; launched on 7 December 1963, sponsored by Mrs. F. Perry Schofield; and commissioned on 11 May 1968, Comdr. Earl H. Graffan in command.

Following shakedown, Schofield conducted training exercises, both independently and with her squadron Destroyer Squadron 23, out of her home port of Long Beach. With the new year, 1969, she participated in 1st Fleet exercises; and, at the end of March she headed across the Pacific for her first WestPac deployment.

On 24 April, the guided missile escort ship joined the 7th Fleet. On 7 May, she commenced operations with Bon Homme Richard (CVA-31) in the Gulf of Tonkin. A week later, she put into Subic Bay, then, after upkeep, she joined other 7th Fleet units in Operation "Sea Spirit," a combined SEATO exercise terminated on 3 June by the collision of USS Frank E. Evans (DD-754) and HMAS Melbourne.

On 17 June, the DEG moved back into the Gulf of Tonkin, remaining into July. On the 6th, she departed the area and headed for Japan where she participated in a joint United States Navy-Japanese Maritime Self Defense Force exercise; then, toward the end of the month, she again set a course for the South China Sea'

Schofield returned to the Gulf of Tonkin on the 27th and, for the next two weeks, operated with Kearsarge (CVS-33). A visit to Hong Kong followed. On 22 August, she returned to Subic Bay, and, in early September, she moved north for patrol duty in Taiwan Strait. On the night of the 8th, she steamed to the assistance of Warbler (MSC-206) caught in heavy seas 70 miles away and unable to transfer fuel to her engine. By the time the DEG arrived, the minecraft was dead in the water. At daybreak, however, Schofield took the MSC in tow and headed for Kaohsiung, whence she returned to patrol duty.

Three days later, Schofield continued north to Japan; participated in HUK exercises; then sailed for Hong Kong, where, for two weeks, she served as station ship. On 23 October, she returned to Japan; and, on 6 November, she headed home.

Arriving on the 21st, the DEG remained in port for most of the remainder of the year. In January 1970 she resumed her antisubmarine warfare exercises off the California coast. Early on the morning of the 9th the exercises with her squadron and Hornet (CVS-12) were interrupted to assist a merchant tanker, SS Connecticut, reported to be sinking approximately 200 miles away. En route to the scene, Schofield refueled Hornet helicopters delivering rescue personnel and equipment to the tanker. Two of Schofield's men EMCS P. L. Kidd and BTI A. E. Personette, were transferred to the tanker. The tanker's master commended the work in saving the ship.

When Schofield arrived on the scene late in the afternoon, the situation was under control. That evening, the exercises were resumed. At mid-month, Schofield returned to Long Beach and entered the naval shipyard there for a yard period which took her into March. Squadron exercises, target ship duty, missile firing exercises, and a reservist training cruise followed. In July, she again entered the shipyard for boiler overhaul work; and, in October, she resumed her 1st Fleet operating schedule.

On 7 January 1971, Schofield headed west. Into February, she conducted exercises in Hawaiian waters, then returned to the west coast for Operation "Admixture," a joint United States-Canadian exercise. During the exercise, the DEG added mothership duties for the experimental hydrofoil, Highpoint ( PGH-1), to her helicopter inflight refueling, plane guard, and escort responsibilities.

The exercise was completed on 4 March. Schofield then returned briefly to Long Beach; and, on the 11th she departed the California coast for the western Pacific. Steaming in company with ASW Group 3 she joined the 7th Fleet on the 26th. On 3 and 4 April, she operated off the Vietnamese coast; and, on the 7th, she arrived in Subic Bay.

Five days later, the group got underway for Singapore, whence they proceeded into the Indian Ocean for ASW exercises. At the end of the month, the ships sailed for Hong Kong; and, on the 11th, they got underway for Japan.

After repairs at Yokosuka, Schofield participated in the first major United States task force exercise in the Sea of Japan in several years, then, on 17 June, she sailed for home. Proceeding north, she participated in ASW exercises between Attu and Kamchatka. On 5 July, she arrived at Long Beach. In August, she began preparations for her first major overhaul. On 1 September, she shifted her home port to San Diego, and on 8 September, she entered the Long Beach Naomi Shipyard for an extended overhaul which took her into 1972.

The overhaul was completed on 6 June 1972, and Schofield sailed to her new home port, San Diego. The next three months were spent in refresher training and various exercises, including two successful launchings of her TARTAR missiles at the Pacific Missile Range.

On 9 September, Schofield departed San Diego for her third tour with the 7th Fleet. After brief stops at Pearl Harbor Midway Island, Guam, and Subic Bay P.I., the DEG joined TU 77.0.1 in the Tonkin Gulf on 8 October. She received her first bombardment mission of the deployment 20 days later and fired all night. On 30 October, she departed the area for Kaohsiung and a period of upkeep. She was back on station in the Tonkin Gulf from 9 November to 8 December for another line period. The DEG then visited Hong Kong and Sasebo before returning to the firing line on New Year's Day, 1973.

Schofield acted as a picket ship until mid-January when she was assigned to provide fire support. She fired daily missions until the 26th when she departed for Subic Bay. She returned to Yankee Station on 13 February and learned that, due to the cessation of hostilities, her WestPac deployment was to be reduced one month. On 15 February, she sailed for Yokosuka and San Diego, arriving at her home port on 9 March.

During a period of restricted availability between April and September, Schofield received extensive helicopter facilities to enable her to operate the SH-2 LAMPS (Light Airborne Multi-Purpose System) hero. She held sea trials in October, firing exercises in early November; and, on the 23d, she was underway for the western Pacific.

Schofield participated in exercises at Pearl Harbor and Midway Island before entering Subic Bay on 18 December. Four days later, she departed for Singapore with orders to continue from there to the Indian Ocean and conduct surveillance operations. She returned to San Diego on 6 June 1974 and is operating from that port as of July 1974.

Schofield received four battle stars for service in Vietnam.


USS Schofield (FFG-3)

USS Schofield (FFG-3) was a Brooke-class frigate laid down on 15 April 1963 by the Lockheed Shipbuilding and Construction Co., Seattle, Washington and launched on 7 December 1963. The ship was sponsored by Mrs. F. Perry Schofield and commissioned on 11 May 1968, Comdr. Earl H. Graffam in command. The ship was named after US Navy Admiral Frank Herman Schofield. The original First Lieutenant was LTJG Lee Witham. Schofield received four battle stars for service in Vietnam.


After 1991

She was sold 20 June 1994 and converted into a power barge.

NVR shows contract terminated 22 Mar 1999 (to be resold).

(The following was taken in it’s entirety from the “Fleet Reserve Association’s Naval Affairs Page. )

From Missile Destroyer to Commercial Power Plant – By Kit Bonner

In mid April 1995, I was reluctantly given permission by a variety of government and private authorities to visit the former Essex Class carrier USS Hornet (CV-12/CVA-12/CVS-12). She was berthed at the now mostly deserted Hunter’s Point Naval Shipyard in San Francisco and is the property of the Astoria Metals Corporation. An organization was formed to keep her, but her fate was uncertain. At least she evaded the breakers torch this past summer. She was on temporary display across the Bay at the Alameda Naval Air Station as part of the VJ Day observances through October 1995, when she was scheduled again to be towed back to Hunter’s Point for disposal. The old carrier was not the only ship at the yard.

While looking for the Hornet, I also found five Charles F. Adams class guided missile destroyers and two Brooke class guided missile escorts quietly nestled alongside the piers that parallel the yard’s main drydock. In addition, there were a variety of former fleet train support ships, and when you consider the available firepower present, the now-forsaken ships represented a credible carrier battle group with substantial amphibious capability. How valuable they might have been off Guadalcanal in August 1942.

The veteran carrier will probably be towed to India or Taiwan for scrapping as will the support ships, but the Consolidated Power and Minerals Corporation of San Francisco which owns the destroyer type ships has something else in mind.

This corporation purchased a total of eighteen ships at an auction recently, seven of which were at the Hunter’s Point Yard. The Missile Escorts are the Schofield (DEG-3) and Ramsey (DEG-2). They are of the Brooke class which displaced 3426 tons/length, 414’/beam, 44’/SHP, 35,000/speed 27 knots. They are armed with one 5-inch/38 cal gun/one Tartar surface to air missile launcher/ASROC and the abortive DASH (robot helicopter) system.

The Brooke class was an interim class of destroyer escort armed with the most up-to-date weapons available in the mid to late 1960s. They were actually the test bed for the Oliver Hazard Perry class fast frigates produced in great numbers some years later. As I walked down the dock toward them with two uncooperative cameras and a camcorder, the DEGs looked almost factory fresh. With the exception of being disarmed and having the end of their five-inch gun barrels cut off, they look as if they could still be operational, at least at a distance.

The Adams class destroyers consisted of the Hoel (DDG-13), Towers (DDG-9), Henry B. Wilson (DDG-7), Robinson (DDG-12) and the first of the class launched in 1959, the Lynde McCormick (DDG-8). The lead ship of these purpose-built guided missile destroyers was the namesake of the class, the Charles F. Adams (DDG-2).

These ships were the first ships designed and built as guided missile destroyers from the keel up. Experiments on the Gyatt (DD-712), a Gearing class destroyer proved the worth of mounting a guided missile on destroyer type ships for air defense. This occurred during that short but barren technological period between the slow firing all gun air defense and the current wizardry of automated guided missile systems and Vulcan Phalanx 20 mm close in weapon.

The Charles F. Adams class provided the Navy with a state-of- the-art air defense system that could respond to any Soviet threat into the 1970s and even beyond. Plus, they were credible anti-submarine warfare platforms and could also be called upon for shore target bombardment with their highly dependable five-inch/54- caliber guns. This class of destroyers, the second built after World War II (just after the Forrest Sherman class) displaced 3370 tons/437′, length/47′, beam/70,000, SHP/speed 33 knots. They were armed with two 5-inch/54-caliber guns/ASROC/Tartar surface to air missiles. They were not helicopter or DASH capable. They were also one of the most attractive ships ever designed for the Navy. They were so well thought of, that Australia and Germany also operated modified versions of this class.

All in all, these were magnificent ships and would last into the 1990s, but all things come to an end. The advent of the Spruance class destroyers and now the powerful Arleigh Burke relegated the old Adam’s class to mothballs and now the auction block. By the early 1990s, most had been decommissioned and laid up. The cutbacks in military appropriations sealed their doom and they were recently stricken.

New Life For Condemned Ships

Most obsolete ships bought from the Navy or commercial shipping lines are reduced for scrap metal, mainly in the backwaters of some far eastern port. Occasionally, one of the more famous will be preserved as a memorial or tourist attraction, but in the case of the destroyers I found at Hunter’s Point, neither fate applies.

Consolidated Power and Minerals Corporation, which purchased the ships from the Navy at auction, systematically reduces the destroyers by removing their masts, superstructure and armaments. The metal from these sources is disposed of as scrap, and what remains is a hull with one deck and two funnels. The hull and remaining structure is then placed in drydock, cleaned and painted. The ship’s engineering system is checked and any necessary repairs carried out, and what emerges is a floating electrical power plant capable of generating up to 60 megawatts.

In essence, a former destroyer has been converted to a portable source of energy for moderate size cities and is capable of generating dependable electricity for up to 20 years. There is such a great demand, that Consolidated is looking into purchasing some of the Leahy and Belknap class cruisers now laid up in Suisun Bay, California, for the same purpose. Ironically, if this happens, this innovative corporation will own the third most powerful Navy in the world!

Consolidated is providing these modern floating power plants to third world nations in South America and the Far East where inexpensive and reliable energy sources are in demand. When you consider that the ships are approximately 35 years old at present, when they complete their service as power sources, they will have served for over half a century.

If by some chance you visit a port city somewhere and see a familiar looking ship in the backwaters that consists of a hull with two funnels, it may have been the tin can or cruiser you served on as a youngster. There is life after death for these ships as they continue to provide valuable service. This is a far better ending than becoming part of a foreign car or a package of throwaway razor blades.

Managed and approved by Vince Cuthie, Director of Communications and Chuck Calkins, National Executive Secretary. Please send questions and comments to FRA at [email protected] or call (703) 683-1400.


Contents

Pacific

Following shakedown, Schofield conducted training exercises, both independently and with her squadron, Destroyer Squadron 23, out of her home port of D&S Piers 32nd St. San Diego. With the new year, 1969, she participated in 1st Fleet exercises and, at the end of March, she headed across the Pacific for her first WestPac deployment.

On 24 April, the guided missile escort ship joined the 7th Fleet. On 7 May, she commenced operations with USS Bon Homme Richard in the Gulf of Tonkin. A week later, she put into Subic Bay then, after upkeep, she joined other 7th Fleet units in Operation Sea Spirit, a combined SEATO exercise terminated on 3 June following the collision of USS Frank E. Evans (DD-754) and HMAS Melbourne.

On 17 June, the DEG moved back into the Gulf of Tonkin, remaining into July. On the 6th, she departed the area and headed for Japan where she participated in a joint United States Navy-Japanese Maritime Self Defense Force exercise then, toward the end of the month, she again set a course for the South China Sea.

Schofield returned to the Gulf of Tonkin on the 27th and, for the next two weeks, operated with USS Kearsarge. A visit to Hong Kong followed. On 22 August, she returned to Subic Bay and, in early September, she moved north for patrol duty in the Taiwan Strait. On the night of the 8th, she steamed to the assistance of USS Warbler caught in heavy seas 70 nautical miles (130 km) away and unable to transfer fuel to her engine. By the time the DEG arrived, the minecraft was dead in the water. At daybreak, however, Schofield took the MSC in tow and headed for Kaohsiung, whence she returned to patrol duty.

Three days later, Schofield continued north to Japan participated in HUK exercises then sailed for Hong Kong, where, for two weeks, she served as station ship. On 23 October, she returned to Japan and, on 6 November, she headed home.

SS Connecticut rescue

Arriving on the 21st, the DEG remained in port for most of the remainder of the year. In January 1970, she resumed her antisubmarine warfare exercises off the California coast. Early on the morning of the 9th, the exercises with her squadron and USS Hornet were interrupted to assist a merchant tanker, SS Connecticut, reported to be sinking approximately 200 nautical miles (370 km) away. En route to the scene, Schofield refueled Hornet helicopters delivering rescue personnel and equipment to the tanker. Two of Schofield's men, EMCS P. L. Kidd and BT1 A. E. Personette, were transferred to the tanker. The tanker's master commended the work in saving the ship.

When Schofield arrived on the scene late in the afternoon, the situation was under control. That evening, the exercises were resumed. At mid-month, Schofield returned to Long Beach and entered the naval shipyard there for a yard period which took her into March. Squadron exercises, target ship duty, missile firing exercises, and a reservist training cruise followed. In July, she again entered the shipyard for boiler overhaul work and, in October, she resumed her 1st Fleet operating schedule.

On 7 January 1971, Schofield headed west. Into February, she conducted exercises in Hawaiian waters, then returned to the west coast for Operation Admixture, a joint United States-Canadian exercise. During the exercise, the DEG added mothership duties for the experimental hydrofoil, USS Highpoint, to her helicopter inflight refueling, plane guard, and escort responsibilities.

The exercise was completed on 4 March. Schofield then returned briefly to Long Beach and, on the 11th, she departed the California coast for the western Pacific. Steaming in company with ASW Group 3, she joined the 7th Fleet on the 26th. On 3 and 4 April, she operated off the Vietnamese coast and, on the 7th, she arrived in Subic Bay.

Five days later, the group got underway for Singapore, whence they proceeded into the Indian Ocean for ASW exercises. At the end of the month, the ships sailed for Hong Kong and, on the 11th, they got underway for Japan.

After repairs at Yokosuka, Schofield participated in the first major United States task force exercise in the Sea of Japan in several years then, on 17 June, she sailed for home. Proceeding north, she participated in ASW exercises between Attu and Kamchatka. On 5 July, she arrived at Long Beach. In August, she began preparations for her first major overhaul. On 1 September, she shifted her home port to San Diego and, on 8 September, she entered the Long Beach Naval Shipyard for an extended overhaul which took her into 1972.

The overhaul was completed on 6 June 1972, and Schofield sailed to her new home port, San Diego. The next three months were spent in refresher training and various exercises, including two successful launchings of her TARTAR missiles at the Pacific Missile Range.

Vietnam

On 9 September, Schofield departed San Diego for her third tour with the 7th Fleet. After brief stops at Pearl Harbor, Midway Island, Guam, and Subic Bay, P.I., the DEG joined TU 77.0.1 in the Tonkin Gulf on 8 October. She received her first bombardment mission of the deployment 20 days later and fired all night. On 30 October, she departed the area for Kaohsiung and a period of upkeep. She was back on station in the Tonkin Gulf from 9 November to 8 December for another line period. The DEG then visited Hong Kong and Sasebo before returning to the firing line on New Year's Day, 1973.

Schofield acted as a picket ship until mid-January when she was assigned to provide fire support. She fired daily missions until the 26th when she departed for Subic Bay. She returned to Yankee Station on 13 February and learned that, due to the cessation of hostilities, her WestPac deployment was to be reduced one month. On 15 February, she sailed for Yokosuka and San Diego, arriving at her home port on 9 March.

During a period of restricted availability between April and September, Schofield received extensive helicopter facilities to enable her to operate the SH-2 LAMPS (Light Airborne Multi-Purpose System) helo. She held sea trials in October, firing exercises in early November and, on the 23d, she was underway for the western Pacific.

Schofield participated in exercises at Pearl Harbor and Midway Island before entering Subic Bay on 18 December. Four days later, she departed for Singapore with orders to continue from there to the Indian Ocean and conduct surveillance operations. She returned to San Diego on 6 June 1974.

Schofield was decommissioned on 8 September 1988 and stricken from the Navy register on 25 January 1992. The ship was sunk as a target on 2 November 1999.


USS Schofield DEG-3 FFG-3 Cruisebook

The entire 1975 cruise book should be in the next few posts.

They have been spread out to assist in ALL the pictures appearing.

The link to the other pages covering the cruise book is near the bottom of the page on the left.

I should have done this long ago… here are the links to the blog entries covering the entire cruise book. This page covers the first part of the cruise book and the links below lead to next section so you should be able to easily read the book starting at the front cover and ending up at the final page.

***** Click the Pic for a Larger View *****

I encourage ALL who want to copy and paste any or all of the cruise book to do so since Web sites can lose data, disappear, etc.

Preserve the 1975 WesPac cruise book for posterity. The more places it is posted the more likely it is to survive.

To enlarge the pictures click on them. Depending upon your browser and/or computer, etc. select “open in a new window” or use your browser “back” button or whatever works for you.

I use FireFox browser and after opening each picture/page I can make it even bigger for easier viewing and reading of text when a “+” sign is my pointer/cursor and I click again to maximize my view. Whatever works for you and your set-up.

I will double check later to ensure all the cruise book pages made it to this blog. My main goal was just to get the pages/pics on the Web… just in case.

Oh, the pic of the “cherry picker” near the helo detachment area… “extra points” for whoever can, in the comments section of that entry, can explain why that pic is there. I remember why, I was present for the event, up on the quarterdeck,

Feel free to leave comments, explanations, anything that adds to the pics.


Cohagan, Richard

I Richard T. Cohagan “Coke” was born 6 December 1928, at Columbus, Ohio. Currently I have gray hair and blue eyes. I enlistedin the U. S. Navy at Columbus, Ohio, on 7 February 1946, and went to boot camp at Camp Perry, Virginia.

I was F1c. My first duty was aboard USS NORRIS (DD 856), Forward Engine Room from 1946-47. I was called back in the Navy 4 October 1950, and went aboard USS BROWN (DD 546) as FN in the After Engine Room until 15 Jan 1951.

After completing EM Class ‘A” School and Movie Operator School in June 1955, on 12 July 1955 I went aboard USS FRANK E. EVANS (DD 754), E Division with EM3 Stan Smythe in charge. I made an electrical change to the vent system in the electronics room next to the Engineering compartment. I made an Exhaust System from the Blower System. When the ET’s propped open the door, the air was drawn through the compartment to help cool that space off some. (Seemed to work..) I left FRANK E. EVANS 17 August 1956. I was told, “my system” was still that way 2 June 1969.

After leaving Frank E. I went aboard USS BRADFORD (DD 546) from August 1956 through February 1957. I made EM2 . Next was USS ALAMAKEE (YTB 410) until 1959 when I went to EM “B” School. I was now EM1. It was 16 December 1959, and I went aboard USS PURDY DD 734). Next stop was Instructor Duty at Great Lakes EM “A” and EM “B” schools, from September 1960 to October 1963. I made EMC and went aboard USS PLUCK (MSO 464) from November 1963 to April 1967. In May 1967 my duty was FLEET TRAINING GROUP San Diego, California. By March 1968 I was promoted to EMCS and then transferred to USS SCHOFIELD (DEG 3) from April 68 to January 1970, then to USS ISLE ROYALE (AD 29), which decommissioned January 1971. My last duty station was COMCRUDESGRU, LONG BEACH, CALIFORNIA from 25 January 1971, to 8 July 1971, when after 23 years I retired, EMCS.


The Schofield Barracks Post Cemetery Submitted by Matthew Heaton [email protected]

The Schofield Barracks Post Cemetery covering 6.3 acres, is located 011 Schofield Barracks between Wahiawa and Kunia.


THE CEMETERY. The cemetery was first established in 1912. The early burials were workers building the installation who fell victim to an epidemic sweeping the island.

Today, the cemetery provides burial plots for active duty military members, military retirees. and their bona fide dependents. This affords the bereaved family a fmal resting place for loved ones that is perpetually cared for without cost.

Headstones for burial plots are purchased and installed at Government expense.
Special honors are arranged for Memorial Day. American flags are placed at each burial site by local Boy and Girl Scouts.

VISITING HOURS. The Schofield Barracks Cemetery is open to visitors every day of the year during daylight hours.

BURIAL HOURS. The Schofield Barracks Cemetery is open for burial services Monday through Friday, 9:00-11 :00 a.m. and 12:00-2:00 p.m. Vaults are not provided.

GRAVE LOCATION. The grave location is to assist you in locating the grave of your loved one. A map of the cemetery showing the site and roster of those interred is located in the pavilion at the entrance to the cemetery.

GRAVE MARKER. A temporary marker is used to mark the grave following the interment. A permanent marker will be furnished by the Government. Every effort is made to have the grave marker delivered within 120 days of the interment. Markers are placed as soon as weather and work schedules permit.

BURIAL OF A SURVIVING SPOUSE. A non-veteran spouse of a deceased veteran who remarries is not eligible for burial in the Post Cemetery. Also, a divorced spouse or a spouse whose marriage to the veteran has been armulled in not eligible for burial.

GROUNDS MAINTENANCE. Immediately after each interment, the grave is filled, leveled, and seeded. Until growing conditions are favorable and turf has been established, burial areas may be substandard in appearance because the soil continues to sink after a burial, a new grave requires repeated renovation. After the grave has stabilized, the overall appearance will improve. The cemetery staff requests your understanding. Matters which appear to need immediate, corrective action should be reported to the cemetery office. NOTE: THE PERSONAL MAINTENANCE OF GRAVESITES BY VISITORS (CUTTING GRASS, TRENCHING AROUND GRAVES AND MARKERS, WATERING WITH THEIR OWN HOSE, PAINTING MARKERS, ETC.) IS NOT AUTHORIZED. PLEASE ALLOW CEMETERY PERSONNEL THE RESPONSIBILITY FOR GROUNDS MAINTENANCE.

FLAGS. The United States Flag is flown over the Post Cemetery every day during the hours of cemetery operation. The flag is flown at half staff during interment services and wreath-laying ceremonies. All graves are decorated for Memorial Day by Boy/Girl Scouts and Cub Scouts with small United States Flags.

SCHOFIELD BARRACKS POST CEMETERY FLORAL REGULATIONS 1. Fresh cut flowers, wreaths and sprays in metal (not glass) containers may be placed on graves.
2. Permanent plantings, statues, vigil lights, glass objects of any kind and any other type of commemorative items, including toys (pin wheels, balloons, wind chimes, stuffed toys or any similar articles) are not permitted.
3. Potted plants and artificial flowers will be permitted on gravesites only during the period five (5) days before to five (5) days after Easter Sunday, Christmas Day and "Hana Matsuri" (April 8). They will also be permitted from July 12 to August 15 in observance of "O-Bon". Christmas trees, no matter what size, are not considered potted plants and will not be allowed.
4. Floral items and other types of decorations will not be secured to headstone markers.
5. The religious convention of placing fruits, beverages (except alcoholic beverages), and religious artifacts on graves is allowed.
6. Please contact the cemetery office for information regarding installation of a permanent flower container. Only one container per grave is allowed.

NOTE: Listed below are vendors who sell permanent flower containers. Their names are provided as a matter of assistance to interested persons. The Schofield Barracks Cemetery neither endorses nor recommends the vendors or their products. Please inquire at one of the below listed establishments if you desire to purchase one of these vases.

Woolsey Funeral and Cemetery Services located in Kaneohe, Hawaii. This Company was awarded the contract for handling burials, managing the headstone maintenance, alignments, urns and vases at the Schofield Barracks Post Cemetery. They manage the vase, urn, and headstone memorial installations and also offer a competative line of very affordable high quality products. They have a sister company: Woolsey Mortuary Services, but, they, as Woolsey Funeral and Cemetery Services handle vases and all other cemetery services. (They are a small local Hawaiian family business that has been in the Islands since 1957. They pride themselves on their attention to detail, knowledge and professionalism.)

Stonecraft
Oahu Cemetery
1718 Kahai Street 2162 Nuuanu Avenue
Honolulu, HI 96819 Honolulu, HI 96817
Tel: (808) 847-3944 Tel: (808) 538-1538

The permanent, in-ground vase must consist of an outer sheath set into the ground and a separate vase that fits into the sheath. It must have a positive locking device to prevent the vase from rising when the sheath becomes filled with water. Flower vase owners are advised to clean out debris, allowing the vase to properly seat in the sheath, will prevent vase damage. Vase must be engraved with Plot, Rowand Grave Number. Cemetery staff will install the vase container at no cost. Please be aware the Schofield Barracks Post Cemetery is not responsible for maintaining, replacing or safeguarding the permanent flower vase containers.

Index maintained by: Bob Jenkins
Hawaii USGenWeb Archives Manager

Bob Jenkins, Hawaii USGenWeb Project Archives File Manager


A NEWSLETTER SERVING FORMER CREWMEN OF USS SCHOFIELD (DEG .

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A NEWSLETTER SERVING FORMER CREWMEN OF USS SCHOFIELD (DEG/FFG-3)THE DECKPLATEVolume 7 Issue 2 August 2009Special Points of Interest COORDINATOR’S COLUMN• Ron Spagna keeps you Hello Schofield family Anything helps. tough old BTC! He is also This issue will be short!! In our last issue the one grateful old sailor and up-to-date on some of a pleasure to talk with and your fellow shipmates We have not had much “Welcome Mat” section was know. Has lots of support in his cover article. input for this quarter’s news jam packed. Lots of new from neighbors as well as letter, as I am sure people names, many who were not Ken Wilson and Sha Marie.• The Treasurer’s Report are busy with vacations, familiar to me. Great to see Per John he loves us and life, etc. We love hearing it as these are the younger wishes to express his is found on page two. from you and look forward guys and can carry this on thanks to all of the to more participation in our as we go along. Many Schofield family.• Welcome Mat is on next issue. Their will be thanks to Gunner Mark another after our Nashville Fletcher and his wife Carol Paul Roeper is also page three. You’ll find reunion in September. (group secretary). They doing OK although the seven new names for have spent countless phone process is a bit rough at the roster. After our last plea for hours contacting and times. Paul and I are plank dues participation the searching for Schofield owners who worked• What was the funniest response was very good. I shipmates. They also have together. Separated and would like to thank all who Mark Crozier working on this lost contact for 30 some thing you remember contributed for their as well. Sometimes good old odd years. Reunited as a from the Navy? See generosity. Our dues are fashioned voice works just direct result of Elliot what two of your ship- $20/year and go primarily fine. Clayton doing some phone mates have to say for the Deckplate work after the Reno about this, starting on publication. We are working Our shipmate John reunion. Turns out Paul page three. on reducing costs and this Winschel is home and doing lives up the road around 45 is a work in progress. better. As always he minutes. Got together and• Don’t forget to sign up Some went over and above appreciates all the thoughts, have developed a nice with their contribution and prayers, phone calls, and for the September 10- again, thanks to all. well wishes. John is one (Continued on page 2) 13 reunion in Nash- ville. You’ll miss a great time if you don’t!

VOLUME 7 ISSUE 1 SCHOFIELD DECKPLATE PAGE 2friendship again. I wish Paul the TREASURER’S REPORTbest and look forward to him beingwith us at the 2010 reunion. SUBMITTED BY ROBERT CICHOWSKI, TREASURER Robert Cichowski wishes to give Treasurer’s Report December 2008up the Treasurer’s position and turnover the account at the Nashville Estimated money in account—$936.66reunion. I’m asking you all to thinkabout assuming the position. We’ll Dues collected 12/31/08turn it over at the reunion. Wouldask that whomever takes it is active Gordon Sebring $20.00 James Borowicz $20.00with our Schofield family. Requirescollecting, posting, and writing a few Money owed to Jack from the San Diego Reunion $51.00checks a year. We are thankful toRobert for his work with us and a Estimated Total Funds in the Association $925.66job well done. Dues collected 01/30/2009 We will be thinking about 2010already and will discuss it at our Lloyd Baker $20.00 David Ocker $20.00Nashville business meeting. Paul Roeper $100.00Hopefully we will get feedback from Kenneth Robinson $20.00everyone regardless of whetherthey are in Nashville or not. We Estimated Total Funds in the Association $1,105.66understand location is always aproblem due to the fact that we Dues Collected 03/22/2009have a huge country and our mates Michael Jones $20.00are spread out. We do try andspread out so as to get as many as Estimated Total Funds in the Association $1,125.66possible included. Please help uswith this and get your input to us. It Adjusted Association Funds +$8.00=$1,133.66is not a one person decision andyour help is appreciated. Deckplate Funding $508.80 I hope we see all of you at the Total Funds in the Association $624.86Nashville reunion. Of course thatis only a fantasy, but we’d like to Dues collected 05/06/2009see as many as possible. Always atreat to meet some new Schofield Thomas Dawdy $100.00 Charles Dickens $40.00family members, and great to see David Tufnell $50.00the ones we’ve seen already. I can’t Anthony Morettini $20.00 James Virmala $40.00emphasize enough that it does not William Zbaeren $40.00matter which generation we are Lee Witham $50.00from. We’ve all served on board andthat is our common bond. It is Gregory Yale $25.00expensive of course but my wifeFrani and I manage to get what we Total Funds in the Association $989.86need to make the trip. We feel it isworth every penny but really is Dues collected 06/09/2009priceless. Hope we See you in Richard Gray $50.00 Dale Hale $20.00September! (Nashville. ) Ron Spagna $50.00 David Maass $40.00RespectfullyRon Spagna Total Funds in the Association $1,149.86USS Schofield reunion coordinator Dues collected 06/24/2009 __________ Charles Kiser $40.00 Dorothy Gruber $20.00 Gaylord Larson $20.00 Dues collected 07/30/2009 Elliot Clayton $30.00 Total Funds in the Association $1,179.86Financial Statement: The cost ofthis issue is $379.43, and wasmailed to 343 members.

VOLUME 7 ISSUE 1 SCHOFIELD DECKPLATE PAGE 3 WELCOME MAT THE FUNNIEST THING THAT HAPPENED IN THE NAVY The following shipmates havebeen located since the last news- Bob Feldman, BT3: was around 1985.letter. Welcome aboard. We hope I was a BT between 1973-1976. I was coming off liberty from theto see you at the next reunion andthat you will take an active part in One of the funniest moments I can Philippines and was hungry. Ofthe association. We welcome: recall was when I a fireman. BTC course the galley was closed be- Grimes told me to tighten a compo- cause we were in port and it was Leonard Carter (1977-78) RM2 nent on our ACC system (automatic late at night. If my memory is cor- 909 W Clark St combustion controls). I grabbed my rect, it was just before midnight. handy screwdriver and commenced Anyway, I was hungry. I went to the Albert Lea, MN 56007 tightening the screws. All this was food preparation door of the galley 507-391-5046 done in front of Grimes. As I was and it was locked. It was always crawling off the boiler top, the tool locked in port. I knew that but [email protected] fell out of my hands and down to cussed anyway. I went down to the the lower level. fireroom, got a paint chipper and John Cooper went back to the galley. I worked (1968-70) BM3 1st Div Grimes told me to go down and and worked at the door jam until I retrieve it and put it away. I went was able to slide the paint chipper 12 Pleasentside Dr down below and tried to find it. I in and open it. “Yes!” I said to my- Wayland, NY 14572 could not see it, and I was not self. I then went in the galley and [email protected] about to crawl in the bilges, under got a whole can of ham, one loaf of the boiler (which had about 12” of bread, mayonnaise, and cheese. I Mark Crozier water in it) looking for it. I hung out locked the door and shut it. I looked 2718 River Wood Ln on the lower level with McDowell for at the lock and it was basically use- Burnsville, MN 55337 about five minutes, then returned to less. Oops. I stashed the food, [email protected] my evaporator station. We were went to berthing and put on my underway at this time. dungarees and went back to the Wayne Martin galley. I was going to take the food (1979-82) BT 2 B Div A few minutes later, a foul smell down to the fireroom for the mid- emanated in the fireroom. Grimes watch. We would feast like kings. PO Box 684 sent everybody on a search for the But before I left the galley, I wrote a Yucca Valley, CA 92286 smell. The lower levelman McDow- simple note. It said, “Snipes Rule!” I ell told Grimes he found it. Grimes taped it to the food preparation 760-674-6069 went down below and shortly door whose lock I destroyed. I got YELLED my name, “FELDMAN!” I to the fireroom and when the guys Kenneth Cooper ran down below and looked to saw what I had, they began to sing (1983-85) E-4 BT where he was pointing. Melting on a my praises. The next morning I was 17406 Bill Booty Rd steam drain line was my screw- in food serving line ordering eggs. Bogalusa, LA 70427 driver handle, dissolving into a yel- When I placed my order, the Galley low blob, then dropping off into the Watch Captain said, “Won’t be any 985-730-4605 bilges, leaving the metal driver on eggs for you Bon. you had mid- [email protected] the piping. rats.” Mid-rats were what was served under for the sailors stand- Eric Lengel Well, the jig was up at that point. ing mid-watches. “The galley was (1978-80) EN2 A Gang Grimes asked me why I lied. I then closed last night there weren’t any told him the truth—it was hot be- mid-rats,” I replied. Again I re- New Holland Rd neath that boiler, and I wasn’t about peated my egg order. The Watch Reading, PA 19540 to crawl under a steaming boiler for Captain then produced my note a screwdriver. and said, “This look familiar?” “How 484-824-3645 would I know?” I replied. “You ru- [email protected] I was laughing at this and ined my door, Bon, and took the though Grimes tried to act mad, he ham I was going to serve for break- Stephen Nelson too was laughing at the situation. fast,” said MS2 Collier. “I want (1972-78) GMT2 3rd Div Trials of a 19 year old. Caught in eggs,” I said. “If you don’t get out of 1222 Freeman Ln #59 the act. line, I’ll report you to the Master-at- Arms (MAA) that you broke into the Pocatello, ID 83201 ___________ 208-232-0095 (Continued on page 4) Zach Bon: [email protected] I was stationed on Schofield __________ from 1981-1986. I was a BT2. Here is my story. and it’s true. I believe it


The American Cowboy Chronicles

Aboard the USS Hancock, as with other ships, we Marines were assigned to maintain law and order as the refugees arrived at our ship. We Marines met each chopper's landing with our M-14 rifles locked loaded -- and with fixed bayonets.

We were told that North Vietnamese and Viet Cong were trying to get aboard the U.S. Navy ships to wreak havoc and perform sabotage.

Wounded and hurt were taken to a sick-bay set up in one of the ready-rooms on the flight deck. There they would be tended to included deloused.

Marines searched men, women, children, and anything they brought aboard. Their Arms were confiscated and thrown overboard. But of course, that wasn't the only thing thrown overboard. When it became apparent that the flight deck was too crowded with Hueys, they too were soon pushed over-board.

Embassy guard Marine Master Sgt. Juan Valdez was the last American to leave Vietnam. The world's largest helicopter airlift was history. A few hours later, North Vietnamese tanks smashed through the gates of the Presidential Palace. Saigon would be renamed Ho Chi Minh City. After 20 years of involvement and 58,220 U.S. military deaths, America was finally done with Vietnam.

In accordance with procedures for deceased Americans in Vietnam, their bodies were transferred to the Seventh Day Adventist Hospital, nearby Tan Son Nhut airport. In telephone calls to the hospital on the afternoon of April 29th, the few remaining staff advised that the bodies had been evacuated when their bodies were left behind. Through diplomatic channels, the U.S. government secured the return of their bodies the following year.

Lance Corporal Darwin L Judge was buried with full military honors in March 1976 in Marshalltown, Iowa. There was a flag-draped coffin, a Marine Honor Guard, and a rifle firing salute. The flag that covered his coffin was folded and presented to his parents. His funeral was so ignored that the mainstream news media did not attend the event. The lone exception being the Daily Iowan (Iowa City, Iowa).

It is said that because of ignorance of his military funeral in March 1976, Lance Corporal Judge was given a second Marine burial with honors 25 years later. Cpl McMahon and LCpl Judge names will be tied together forever as the last two Marines killing in action in Vietnam.

By the beginning of May, the USS Hancock had off-loaded BLT 2/4 and then arrived in Subic Bay, Phillippines, to off-load the refugees it carried.

Lastly, the "Mayaguez incident" took place between the Kingdom of Cambodia and the United States from May 12th to the 15th, 1975, less than a month after the Khmer Rouge took control of the capital Phnom Penh. U.S. Marine contingent aboard the USS Hancock did not arrive until May 16th. By then, Washington had halted the operation.

The taking of the merchant ship S.S. Mayaquez and its American crew by Khmer Rouge pirates was the cause of the subsequent battle at Koh Tang Island that followed. The battle of Koh Tang Island is the last official battle of the Vietnam War. Of that last battle, 15 U.S. Marines were killed in action, 50 wounded, another 23 Marines were killed en-route in a helicopter. Some say the helicopter was shot out of the sky. Some say it was engine failure.

But as sad as it is to say, 3 Marines were left behind and executed. The 3 Marines left behind are listed as missing in action but presumed dead. The names of the Marines killed, and those of the three Marines who were left behind on the island of Koh Tang after the battle and were subsequently executed by the Khmer Rouge pirates are the last names on the Vietnam Veterans Memorial.

May God Bless them and the other more than 58,000 American troops who died in that war.


Wheeler Army Air station base housing, Wahiawa (Central Oahu)

Wheeler is a former Air Force base that was handed over to the Army to create an Air Station. They have 24 Attack (Apache) AH 64's at Wheeler and other helicopters that conduct flights around Wahiawa.

US Army Garrison Hawaii (USAG-Hawaii) is the Department of Defense executive agent for Wheeler base housing on Oahu, and is located at Building 950, 215 Duck Road, Schofield Barracks, Wahiawa, HI.


Watch the video: Om Berre Lykke Kristine Moen VHO (May 2022).